How-To May 8

AAPL: 92.72

-0.52
Stock Chart

I normally run my 15″ MacBook Pro at default resolution, which equates to a useable space of 1440-by-900. While this default resolution is great for reading and writing, I’ve found that it’s not always so good for editing with timeline-based apps, such as Final Cut Pro X.

Generally speaking, it’s better to have more resolution for timeline-based apps, because the timelines can be so long and expansive. A larger field of view gives content creators more flexibility and room to work with on the canvas.

Wouldn’t it be nice if your Mac automatically adjusted to a higher resolution when running a certain app, and automatically switched back to default resolution when closing said app? In this post, we’ll show you how to wield SwitchResX, a utility geared towards managing your Mac’s screen resolution, in such a way that makes that possible. expand full story

How-To May 6

AAPL: 92.72

-0.52
Stock Chart

Yesterday, we wrote a post about hiding the menu bar, and in the corresponding video tutorial, we used window snapping to highlight one of the benefits of a hidden menu bar. Afterwards, I received several tweets and emails asking how to perform window snapping, since this is not a feature that appears natively in OS X.

Window snapping allows you to position windows in specific areas of the screen, usually by dragging the window to the edge of the screen, causing the window to “snap” into place. This feature was first popularized by Microsoft’s Aero Snap on Windows. Even though Apple doesn’t natively support it, window snapping is available on the Mac via a variety of third-party apps. expand full story

9to5toys 

How-To May 5

AAPL: 93.24

-0.95
Stock Chart

If you’re running OS X El Capitan, it’s possible to hide the menu bar on your primary display. Hiding the menu bar works very much like a hidden Dock in OS X, in that when you move your cursor to the edge of the screen, the menu bar reappears from its hidden state. In this post we’ll show you how to hide your menu bar, and why you might consider doing so. expand full story

How-To May 3

AAPL: 95.18

1.54
Stock Chart

How-To April 30

AAPL: 93.74

-1.09
Stock Chart

Recently I noticed that my Late 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display seemed to be dying at a faster clip. Naturally, I assumed that the battery might be going bad.

After checking the battery cycle count, I learned that I was probably wrong about the battery being bad, as the cycle count was still well within the normal life span of my MacBook. Here’s how I was able to verify that everything was okay with my MacBook’s battery.

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