March 15, 2012

Ouch! was a violation of Apple’s rules. An engineer in Singapore revealed the transgression on his blog in February, and Path co-founder Dave Morin got hauled into Apple’s headquarters to be grilled by Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook and other executives, according to people familiar with the meeting but not authorized by Apple to discuss it.

Unfortunately for Apple, it was not just Path; and, unfortunately for iOS users, it is not just contacts. expand full story

March 8, 2012

Path’s iOS app was just updated in the App Store to introduce a number of new features, including Nike+ GPS Running Stories, Music Match for identifying and sharing currently playing songs, and camera improvements with “Focus & Exposure” and “Pow!” comic book effects.

Perhaps the biggest part of the update is the Nike+ integration. Path has a website up showcasing a demo of the new GPS Running Stories feature. Now in Nike+, there is an option within Share Settings to share on Path. The demo explained, “When you start a run, Path will let your friends know. If they add an emotion or comment on your run, you’ll hear a cheer!” Path will also display when your friends “cheered you on” and when you hit your best pace. Today’s update does not address the privacy issues over address book data that came up last month, but apparently there is an update for that on the way…
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February 15, 2012

The Path debacle just took another turn for the worse with House Energy & Commerce Committee Ranking Member Henry Waxman and Commerce Manufacturing and Trade Subcommittee Chair G.K. Butterfield issuing a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook (via The Next Web). In it, the legislators seek to find out whether Apple is doing enough to protect personal data on users’ iPhones, including their contacts. Specifically, the letter asserts there have been claims that the practice of collecting address book data without users’ consent is “common and accepted among iOS app developers.”

As a consequence, the legislators argue, “This raises questions of whether Apple’s iOS app developer policies and practices adequately protect consumer privacy.” They want Apple to respond to questions by Feb. 29. Apple is asked to detail its App Store review practices in respect to protecting users’ information. Whichever way you look at it, it is hard to escape the notion that everything on your iPhone is waiting to be uploaded.

As you know, with the exception of location services, iOS does not prompt users when apps tap APIs to access personal data stored in an iPhone’s address book, camera roll, music library and other places. This also includes little things such as geolocation information embedded in image files taken on the device. This is bothering the legislators and now they want to know why Apple has not implemented a simple toggle that lets users control access to their data other than location.

You have built into your devices the ability to turn off in one place the transmission of location information entirely or on an app-by-app basis. Please explain why you have not done the same for address book information.

We included the letter in its entirety below the fold.

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February 8, 2012

The web exploded yesterday after blogger Arun Thampi discovered the app Path sends every contact in a user’s address book to Path’s servers via a. plist upon registering for the service. The .plist includes full names, phone numbers, and e-mails. Path did not ask users to accept the feature, and it went ahead and saved contact information without telling them. Obviously, people have the right to be worried.

Path’s CEO Dave Morin issued an apology today after yesterday’s data scare and tried to reassure users about Path’s stance on protecting privacy.

We made a mistake. Over the last couple of days users brought to light an issue concerning how we handle your personal information on Path, specifically the transmission and storage of your phone contacts.

As our mission is to build the world’s first personal network, a trusted place for you to journal and share life with close friends and family, we take the storage and transmission of your personal information very, very seriously.

Path released a new update to the iTunes App Store (version 2.0.6) to help remedy the situation that let’s users opt in or out from Path storing address books on its server. If you opt in at first, and then later realize you would like to opt out—you can email Path and it will remove the address book from its servers.

Path also deleted the data it stored.

We believe you should have control when it comes to sharing your personal information. We also believe that actions speak louder than words. So, as a clear signal of our commitment to your privacy, we’ve deleted the entire collection of user uploaded contact information from our servers. Your trust matters to us and we want you to feel completely in control of your information on Path.

Path users (that have not bailed on the service) might want to visit the App Store for an update.

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February 7, 2012


Blogger Arun Thampi discovered something that may or may not sit right about the free social media app Path while packet sniffing the app last night. Upon first installing the app and registering for an account, Path sends each one of your contacts in your address book to their server via a. plist. The .plist includes full names, phone numbers, and e-mails.

Path makes the call “” when you first create an account, and it uploads all your contacts to its server. In most people’s mind, this obviously makes them feel a little uncomfortable. Thampi details the technical aspects of this, and how you can recreate it yourself, in his blog post.

Path’s Cofounder and CEO Dave Morin commented on the situation and said iPhone users will soon be able to opt-out of the setting in an update that will roll out to the App Store shortly. Nevertheless, does that really change anything? He did not really explain why Path is doing this, and your entire address book is still on their servers. You can read Morin’s comment after the break:

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January 28, 2011

December 7, 2009

While everyone talks about the iPhone, the mobile device’s non-telephone sibling the iPod touch continues to grow its market share at a clamorous rate, leading mobile analytics firm, Flurry, to call it Apple’s “weapon of mass consumption”.

Flurry estimates that of 58 million iPhones and iPod touches sold by Apple up to September, 24 million are iPod touches.

“The iPod touch is quietly building a loyal base among the next generation of iPhone users, positioning Apple to corner the smartphone market not only today, but also tomorrow,”

November 14, 2009


AAPL: 111.60

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The U.S. Justice Department has said that is now satisfied with Apple’s measures to guard against any repetition of the type of anti-competitive behaviour ruled illegal in the long-running ebooks trialBloomberg reports that the department has recommended that the court-appointed monitor is no longer necessary.

In a letter to the Manhattan federal judge who found in 2013 that Apple illegally conspired with publishers to set e-book prices, the U.S. said Apple has “now implemented meaningful antitrust policies, procedures, and training programs that were obviously lacking at the time Apple participated in and facilitated the horizontal price-fixing conspiracy found by this court.”

The letter did, however, note that Apple “never embraced a cooperative working relationship with the monitor” …  expand full story

October 9

AAPL: 112.12

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October 8

AAPL: 109.50

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October 6

AAPL: 111.31

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Updated parental guidelines are needed to help make informed decisions about the use of technology by children, says the American Academy of Pediatrics, as it revealed that more than 30% of U.S. children first use a mobile device while still in diapers. The AAP says that “digital life begins at a young age, and so must parental guidance.”

The Academy says that its existing policy statement was actually drafted before the first iPad was launched. A two-day symposium held earlier this year generated twelve key messages, based not just on limiting screen time but also on distinguishing helpful from harmful use of technology …  expand full story

September 29

AAPL: 109.06

Stock Chart

We’re here at Box’s BoxWorks conference in San Francisco where Tim Cook is set to open the event with a fireside chat speaking with CEO Aaron Levie. The event is set to kick off shortly at Moscone Center with enterprise an obvious focus of the conversation. Aside from IBM and Cisco partnerships, Apple recently unveiled the 12.9-inch iPad Pro — coming in November — with optional Apple Pencil stylus and Smart Keyboard case, a new product that will certainly set its targets on enterprise customers. Cook’s talk today also marks the first since Apple announced its record 13 million iPhone sales during launch weekend of the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. Check out the details below: expand full story

September 27

AAPL: 114.71

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In this week’s episode of The Logic Pros, after looking at some high quality hardware over the past few weeks or so, we are going back to basics with busses, aux tracks, sends and more. While Apple has made it about as easy as we can imagine for new users jumping into Logic for the first time, from Garageband or otherwise, a general understanding of these features can make a huge difference in the quality of a composition. The basic but powerful features allow creators to get a lot more mileage out of their DAWs, while providing features commonly used by professional producers/engineers on a daily basis: expand full story

September 23

AAPL: 114.32

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September marks the Apple Watch’s sixth month on the market, and there are already plenty of accessories available — great Apple Watch stands and battery packs, interesting cases, and lots of replacement wristbands. As time has gone on, I’ve become increasingly interested in replacement bands, as they do the most to change the way an Apple Watch feels. They can also change how the watch looks, but in a more subtle and tasteful way than any of the Apple Watch cases I’ve seen.

Two companies have just introduced premium Apple Watch bands that promise to deliver atypical style for their prices. Long-time Apple case maker Incipio has chosen to focus on fabric bands, offering the new Premium Leather Band ($60) and woven nylon Nato ($40) as upgrades to Apple’s plasticky Sport Bands. By comparison, a younger company called Wristouch is primarily targeting fans of steel bands with Mesh ($69), Oyster ($99), and Meta ($119), each considerably more affordable than Apple’s Milanese Loop and Stainless Steel Link Band. Wristouch also has a band called Rubber ($49) as a same-priced but sturdier alternative to Apple’s Sport Band…

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September 18

AAPL: 113.45

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Apple has scored a belated additional victory against Samsung in its endless patent trial battle with the smartphone rival. Apple had originally asked the court for two remedies: financial compensation, and an injunction forbidding Samsung from continuing to sell devices which infringed its patents. The court said yes to the first, no to the second.

As the WSJ reports, a federal appeals court judge has ruled that the court should have also granted the injunction.

“Samsung’s infringement harmed Apple by causing lost market share and lost downstream sales and by forcing Apple to compete against its own patented invention,” the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said[…]

The appeals court [ruled that] a California trial court that previously denied Apple’s request “abused its discretion when it did not enjoin Samsung’s infringement” … 

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September 17

AAPL: 113.92

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iOS 9 has now been out for 24 hours now and the first usage data is in. According to analytics from Mixpanel, iOS 9 has crossed the 12% adoption mark of all iOS devices one day after launch. Although 12% is a good figure, it is actually down a bit from last year’s rate of adoption of iOS 8, which managed 16% device penetration during the same period. This is despite iOS 9 actually being easier to update due to lower storage space requirements, but it’s possible that early server hiccups led some users to delay updating. Mixpanel says iOS 9 and iOS 8 are currently reporting similar upgrade paths:

iOS 9 has received 12% adoption in the last 24 hours and is being adopted similar to iOS 8 last year. However, one issue for it being substantially slow compared to iOS 7 is that servers are having trouble keeping up right now as people update.

iOS 7 continues to dwarf both iOS 8 and iOS 9 in terms of initial adoption, reaching over 20% penetration in its first day of availability. Data from 9to5Mac’s audience is more impressive with over 50% of readers already on iOS 9.0. Obviously, our data has a tendency to be heavily biased upwards because of our audience demographics.

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September 16

AAPL: 116.41

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iOS 9 marked the first major version of the iPhone and iPad software that Apple opened up for public beta testing after a similar trial run with iOS 8.3 last year. As many users have noticed, Apple’s public beta program is continuing with the upcoming iOS 9.1 release available as an OTA (over-the-air) update for non-developer testers, but many users will surely want to hop off the beta train and onto the stable release cycle with today’s iOS 9.0 release.

Several readers have already asked about downgrading from the iOS 9.1 public beta to today’s iOS 9.0 release, and while it’s possible it does come at a cost: potentially losing some important data. If moving from iOS 9.1 public or even dev beta to today’s official iOS 9.0 release is worth it for you, read on for a detailed guide for doing just that. expand full story

August 20

AAPL: 112.65

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Smart plugs aren’t exactly new. Belkin has its WeMo platform of connected home devices including its Wi-Fi-enabled ‘Insight Switch’, an iPhone app-controlled outlet, and others have similar competing products. But iHome’s new SmartPlug is one of the first arriving for Apple’s recently launched Siri-controlled HomeKit platform. I’ve been testing out the product in recent weeks to see exactly what HomeKit adds to the experience and to get a real world taste of Apple’s home automation platform in general for the first time with an actual product. Now that it’s officially available for purchase, here’s what you need to know… expand full story

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