java ▪ July 26, 2012

java ▪ June 25, 2012

java ▪ May 23, 2012

java ▪ April 10, 2012

Over the past few weeks, security experts have warned Mac users of a new virus making its rounds called the “Flashback” trojan. Flashback is allegedly on over 600,000 Macs, which is roughly 1-percent of the 45 million out there. Flashback exploits a pair of vulnerabilities in older versions of Java. Apple may have patched it, but it is still out there and running on many machines.

How do you know if you are infected? F-Secure has a few Terminal commands to check your machine. For the many who are not adept at keeping their Java updates fresh, terminal commands are going to be even more foreign. Luckily, ArsTechnica points us to a free Flashback checker available on github. The app runs the same checks as you would in Terminal, but automates it for you.

We ran the test ourselves and were clean, but one of our readers found that he had the virus last week. It is definitely worth checking out. If your Mac does have Flashback, F-secure offers a great guide on how to remove it.

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java ▪ April 5, 2012

Earlier this week, Apple released a Java security update, 2012-001, to patch the Flashback vulnerability that a security company claims affected 600,000 Macs.

Late this evening, we are getting reports from readers that a new version of the Java update is becoming available via Software Update.

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The latest update, Java for OS X 2012-002, supersedes the -001 update Apple released earlier this week, and indeed the KB article linked from the -002 update is still the -001 version (below).

Update: Apple sent a note out to its Java Community, below, with the ‘why’ (small issue they are the same but for a few symlinks and version numbers.)

Thanks Jessie! expand full story

java ▪ February 24, 2012

A new variant of the Flashback trojan horse called “Flashback.G” is reportedly out in the wild and able to exploit a pair of vulnerabilities found in an older version of Java run-time, according to a blog post by antivirus maker Intego yesterday. People running Snow Leopard and an older Java run-time are at high risk as the primary spreading method calls for maliciously crafted websites. When visiting such pages, the malware exploits a browser’s security settings and installs itself without any intervention on the user’s part.

Even if you use the latest Java run-time installation, the malware can still falsely report a Java certificate as signed by Apple (though it is reported as untrusted), duping naïve users into clicking the Continue button in the certificate window and letting the trojan infect the host system.

Upon infection, the trojan will suck personal data into the cloud, including sensitive usernames and passwords for Google, PayPal, eBay, and other popular websites. One possible sign of infection includes unexpected crashes in Safari, Skype, and other apps with embedded browser content.

So, how does one protect oneself from this nasty piece of software?

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