Apple granted major patent for iWallet, drawings depict iPhone with NFC, transactions via iTunes billing backend

Ever since we first sampled the Starbucks app in September 2009, we could not help but wax eloquently how your iPhone will become your wallet. A deluge of ideas Apple has patented with NFC over time, and some interesting hirings, hint that the company is heavy into NFC. Then, in January, 9to5Mac heard from a developer at Macworld that iPhone 5 would have NFC and that MasterCard/Paypass would launch partners for an Apple-branded payment service that would span both iOS devices and Macs.

Fast forward to today, as the United States Trademark & Patent Office awards the company a major patent grant that covers the intricacies of the iWallet. According to PatentlyApple, this invention is supported by as much as 23 patent claims and dates back to the first quarter of 2009—indicating just how important it must have been to Apple.

The document outlines “techniques for implementing and defining financial transaction rules for controlling a subsidiary financial account,” allowing parents to control spending of their children, for example. Financial transaction rules are also detailed that would allow for spending limits based upon different criteria, such as a particular time period or geographic region.

The really interesting part about this are the drawings included with the patent application depicting a future iPhone with Near Field Communications (see the above illustration). The drawings indicate the use of iTunes billing system for credit card statements and records. The iWallet app could also tie nicely with a number of other utilities Apple’s been researching, such as this iPhone app for buying movie tickets.

But what’s in all this for you and me?

Read more

Louis CK uses Final Cut Pro to make successful self-promoted video


(adult topics/language: NSFW)

There is a lot of buzz on the net right now on Louis CK’s self-promoted video which he launched this week for $5, DRM free.  We love the idea and loved the 1.1GB video.  One interesting note, via Reddit interview: Louis CK does his own editing on Final Cut Pro:

You’ve been listed as a video editor on most of your projects. What program do you use to edit and why have you decided to take on this role?link

I love editing. I have used Avid in the past but I exclusively use Final Cut Pro now, though I am concerned about the future… You always have to put three dots after the future… editing is part of the process. It’s how you form everything. In some ways not editing yourself would be like a sculptor dropping some clay off at a guys house and saying “Make a naked lady chasing a bull. and do it nice.”

The experiment seems to be a success

The show went on sale at noon on Saturday, December 10th. 12 hours later, we had over 50,000 purchases and had earned $250,000, breaking even on the cost of production and website. As of Today, we’ve sold over 110,000 copies for a total of over $500,000. Minus some money for PayPal charges etc, I have a profit around $200,000 (after taxes $75.58). This is less than I would have been paid by a large company to simply perform the show and let them sell it to you, but they would have charged you about $20 for the video.

Get the video here (highly recommended). Read more

Cool stuff from around the web

Today isn’t a particularly heavy newsday so we thought we’d bring in some small stuff from around the web.  First up is Canon’s new calculator mouse.  I’m not sure I’d use the calculator enough to warrant a switch from my Apple hardware.  Maybe during tax season.

Next up, use an iPhone and brain waves to shift gears on a bike… Read more

Apple kicks Wikileaks app out of the App Store

So much for Thinking Different™: Looks like Apple may have joined Amazon, Banc of America, Paypal and other corporations which have evicted Wikileaks from their servers — the briefly-available Wikileaks app for iPhone and iPad has been kicked out of the App Store.

The Time person of the year public vote-winning Julian Assange-founded Wikileaks has attracted controversy with the leak of a series of US diplomatic cables which illustrate the seamier side of international diplomacy. Read more