Apple says Heartbleed security flaw did not affect its software or services

heartbleed

With an estimated half a million sites vulnerable to the “Heartbleed” vulnerability revealed earlier this week, which allows an attacker to access user details of websites previously believed to be secured by industry-standard SSL/TLS, your favorite social networks, stores, and other services around the web could potentially be handing out your password or other personal information to anyone who exploits the issue.

The bug exists in a library called OpenSSL, which is an open-source SSL implementation that many—but not all—web services use to secure sensitive traffic. If a website you use is affected by the bug, your personal data could be given to just about anyone. Unfortunately, changing your password on an unsecure site won’t even help unless the site’s owners have installed a fix (because the attackers can simply exploit the bug again to get your new password).

This serious issue affects a number of high-profile sites, but it seems your Apple ID is safe. Today, Apple gave the following statement to Re/code:

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Security consultant takes less than a day to exploit OS X bug to capture all SSL traffic

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Update: The bug has been fixed in OS X 10.9.2

Security consultant Aldo Cortesi said in a blog post (via ZDNet) that it took him less than a day to exploit the goto fail bug in OS X to capture all SSL traffic, and that there’s a good chance he isn’t the first to have done so – an implicit suggestion that the vulnerability may already be being used in man-in-the-middle attacks.

I’ve confirmed full transparent interception of HTTPS traffic on both IOS (prior to 7.0.6) and OSX Mavericks. Nearly all encrypted traffic, including usernames, passwords, and even Apple app updates can be captured. This includes:

  • App store and software update traffic
  • iCloud data, including KeyChain enrollment and updates
  • Data from the Calendar and Reminders
  • Find My Mac updates
  • Traffic for applications that use certificate pinning, like Twitter …  Read more

Reasons for delay in SSL fix to OS X unclear as a single line of code found responsible

update

Update: Apple issued OS X 10.9.2 the following day, which included a fix for the SSL bug.

After Apple fixed the SSL bug in iOS, it’s unclear why three days have passed without an OS X fix after it was revealed by Reuters that the vulnerability was created by an error in a single line of code.

The problem lies in the way the software recognizes the digital certificates used by banking sites, Google’s Gmail service, Facebook and others to establish encrypted connections. A single line in the program and an omitted bracket meant that those certificates were not authenticated at all, so that hackers can impersonate the website being sought and capture all the electronic traffic before passing it along to the real site.

As the bug is in Apple’s SSL authentication code, it leaves a whole range of apps vulnerable, not just Safari …  Read more