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A YouGov survey of more than 1,000 American consumers commissioned by security company Tresorit found that just over a third of them have taken steps to beef-up their online security in response to the iCloud hacks.

The most common response was to change passwords for stronger ones, with 13 percent creating different passwords for each online service and 6 percent enabling two-step verification … 

The celebrity nudes obtained from iCloud appear to have been accessed as a result of conventional attacks rather than anything iCloud-specific, an Apple statement confirming our own theory that a combination of phishing and security questions were used.

Metadata analysis suggests that the hackers were able to obtain complete backups of the iPhones targeted. A criminal investigation into the leaked photos is being led by the FBI.

Apple has promised a number of security improvements in response to the hacks, including push notifications when someone tries to change a password, restore from iCloud to a new device or logs in to iCloud from an unknown device. It will also be “aggressively encouraging” use of two-factor authentication, which will be extended to cover accessing iCloud from a mobile device.

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