Last week, Flickr announced that it will be making some big changes to its consumer plans, which include dropping its free tier with 1TB of storage down to allowing just 1,000 photos. Now, Flickr is out today to clarify what the changes mean for institutions and organizations.

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Shared in a blog post, Flickr wrote to ease the concerns for all the organizations that use the service to preserve history and more.

The Flickr Commons is for photos that come from institutions that want to share their digital collections with as many people around the world as they can. These tend to be historical images whose copyright has expired or government images that are automatically in the public domain since taxpayers have technically already paid for them.

Photos from NASA, the National Parks Service, the UK National Archives, and The British Library, for example, have been shared in The Flickr Commons. As part of The Flickr Commons, all these organizations already were Pro or have received a free Pro account from us, so they have unlimited storage.

The company notes that any images with a Flickr Commons or Creative Commons license established before the announced changes on November 1st are safe. However, CC photos will be held to the new 1,000 limit come January 8, 2019.

The Flickr Commons photos (those uploaded by the archival, governmental, etc. institutions we are working with) are safe. We are extremely proud of these partnerships. These photos won’t be deleted as a result of any of our announced changes. The only reason they’d disappear is if the organization that uploaded them decided to delete them.

Creative Commons photos that were licensed as such before our announcement are also safe. We won’t be deleting anything that was uploaded with a CC license before November 1, 2018. Even if you had more than 1,000 photos or videos with a CC license. However, if you do have more than 1,000 photos or videos uploaded, you’ll be unable to upload additional photos after January 8, 2019, unless you upgrade to a Pro account.

The post also details that Flickr wants to help any non-profits that might have concerns about the new Pro plan costs. A link is available below for any qualifying organization that needs help with a free Pro account.

Organizations such as the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), 350.org, and Second Harvest are already using Flickr to share photos of the amazing work they do. And now we’ll be working with them to ensure Pro isn’t a cost they need to worry about.

In fact, you can fill out the form from this page with information about your 501(c)(3) organization, and we’ll work with you to get your free Pro account set up.

For more details on the latest Flickr changes, read our previous coverage and see today’s full post from Flickr.


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