MacBook Pro Overview Updated June 2, 2017

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August 2010 - June 2017


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Apple finally updated its MacBook Pro range in October 2016 – the first major update since the original Retina models in 2012. The main changes include:

  • Skylake processors
  • Radeon Pro GPUs (15-inch models only)
  • Faster PCIe SSDs in capacities up to 2TB
  • Improved display, with greater brightness & contrast, and a wider color gamut
  • Four USB-C sockets incorporating Thunderbolt 3 (replacing all older ports except the headphone jack)
  • Touch Bar replacement for hardware function keys (a Retina OLED display)
  • Touch ID power button for log ins, Apple Pay
  • Larger Force Touch trackpad
  • 2nd-generation butterfly keyboard
  • Smaller and slimmer form-factor
  • Space Gray color option in addition to the usual silver

2016 MacBook Pro

The flagship is the 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, available in two standard specs: a 2.6GHz Core i7 processor, Radeon Pro 450 GPU and 256GB PCIe SSD, and a 2.7GHz Core i7 processor with Radeon 455 GPU and 512GB PCIe SSD. This can be maxed-out with a build-to-order 2.9GHz i7 CPU, Radeon Pro 460 with 4GB memory and 2TB PCIe SSD. All models have 16GB RAM and four USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports. Pricing starts at $2399.

The 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar is also available in two models: a 2.9GHz Core i5 CPU, Intel Iris 550 GPU and 256GB PCIe SSD, and a 2.9GHz Core i5 SSD, the same Intel Iris 550 GPU and 512GB PCIe SSD. Both models have 8GB RAM. The maxed-out version offers a 3.3GHz i7 CPU, 16GB RAM and 1TB PCIe SSD, but there’s no option for a discrete GPU. All models have four USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports. Pricing starts at $1799.

Additionally, Apple launched a new 13-inch MacBook Pro without the Touch Bar, with a 2GHz i5 CPU, Intel Iris 540 GPU, 256GB PCIe SSD and just two USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Older models

Premiered in 2012 as a successor to the MacBook Pro, the MacBook Pro with Retina Display is sold in 13.3″ (2560×1600-pixel) and 15.4″ (2880×1800-pixel) versions.

Non-Retina models (discontinued)

First released in 2006 and last redesigned in 2008, the non-Retina MacBook Pro was at one time known as the ‘MacBook,’ and remained on sale right up until the launch of the 2016 models.

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Read below for all of our MacBook Pro coverage

MacBook Pro Stories June 2

AAPL: 155.45

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When Apple unveiled the 2016 MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, I wasn’t so sure I was ready to go all-in on USB-C. I’m not against using dongles, but the idea of having to carry multiple around was not appealing.

After spending a week with the Satechi Type-C Pro Hub, it has quickly become a staple accessory for me. With its functionality, design, and construction, Satechi built a hub I would expect out of Apple.

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MacBook Pro Stories May 30

AAPL: 153.67

0.06
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The Apple Online Store is now out of stock of current 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar configurations, with estimated delivery quoted as June 5 – June 7. Amazon is also reporting constrained stock availability of the 15-inch models.

June 5 just happens to be the same day as the WWDC keynote which points to a hardware refresh at the event. The change in shipping times was first noticed by MacRumors. Although WWDC is typically a software event, there have been several rumors of new hardware this time around …

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MacBook Pro Stories May 17

AAPL: 150.25

-5.22
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A few weeks ago we reviewed Aukey’s USB-C to HDMI Cable for the MacBook Pro. It worked, but since it featured HDMI 1.4, it only allowed for connecting to 4K displays at 30Hz max.

While such an adapter works well for watching movies with lesser refresh rates, 30Hz is not the ideal refresh rate for working on a computer monitor. Such a refresh rate can often lead to headaches and eyestrain, not to mention the choppiness and laggy cursor movement.

Accell’s new USB-C adapter promises to address this issue by including HDMI 2.0. How is this possible when USB-C only supports HDMI 1.4b? Watch our hands-on video inside for the details. expand full story

9to5toys 

Batteries are a consumable component that have a limited life span or cycle count. Apple’s various products use different batteries that have varying cycle count limits. Let’s take a look at some useful things to keep in mind when trying to get the most out of your MacBook Pro battery or when looking at buying a used MacBook.

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MacBook Pro Stories May 16

AAPL: 155.47

-0.23
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WWDC 2017 may be quite the hardware event this year despite the recent focus on software alone in recent years. iPad Pro updates and a possible Siri speaker have already been rumored, and now Bloomberg reports a MacBook Pro update will happen:

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MacBook Pro Stories May 15

AAPL: 155.70

-0.40
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I recently got my hands on the Atomos Ninja Inferno external recorder and monitor for my Panasonic GH5. This 7-inch monitor allows you to record 4K video directly to 2.5-inch SATA SSDs. It’s a wonderful tool for my video workflow, because it allows for extra long recording times, and fast data transfers to my Mac.

The only problem is that the external monitor doesn’t ship with the needed USB-enabled caddy for transferring data from the SSD to my MacBook Pro. Atomos sells a docking station, but it’s limited to USB-A connections.

That’s where StarTech’s wonderful USB-C to SATA adapter comes in. This inexpensive adapter makes it super-easy to transfer data from a SATA-enabled SSD to the MacBook Pro via USB-C. Watch our hands-on video inside for the details. expand full story

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