AAPL-100-1st time

Apple’s stock has just hit $100 per share for the first time its stock split in June and adjusted for the 7-1 stock split, the first time it has approached its all time high since 2012. Morgan Stanley unleashed a uber-bull report this morning touting the Eight reasons Morgan Stanley thinks it’s time to buy AAPL which is thought to have pushed Apple over the top.

Apple was over $700 (pre the 7 to 1 stock split earlier this year) in the lead up to the iPhone 5’s highly anticipated debut in fall 2012. Apple’s all-time closing high (adjusted for the stock split) is $100.30, and it seems that the company could soon hit that threshold once again.

Update: Apple closes at an all-time high:

Screenshot 2014-08-19 13.04.45

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4 Responses to “AAPL hits all-time high in lead up to major fall product launches”

  1. I honestly don’t understand this article, since my knowledge in stocks is quite poor. Anyone kind enough to explain the “split”, and how do you compare the 100$ to the 700$ from 2012 ? Thanks a lot.

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    • Tim Jr. says:

      They are the same.. no difference.. just allows those with less money to get into the game easier w/o having to throw down 700 per share.

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    • herb02135go says:

      Imagine going to a bank and asking them to break a $10 bill into 10 one-dollar bills. Same concept.

      So a stockholder who had one Apple share worth $700 now has seven shares worth $100 each.

      As has been stated, this allows people to buy smaller amounts of stock.

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      • alright, so right now the stock would at 700$ if they didn’t do the split. But should we consider it as important as if it was at 700$ before, or are we just being like “if that was before the split, AAPL would be at 700$)

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