Sony hired Academy and Emmy award-winning screenwriter and producer Aaron Sorkin to write the screenplay for its upcoming Steve Jobs biopic (not to be confused with the one Ashton Kutcher is starring in), reported Variety. Sony’s biopic will cover the life of late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs and will be an adaptation of the official biography “Steve Jobs,” which is written by famed author Walter Isaacson and released last fall.

You may recognize Sorkin’s name from the hit movie “The Social Network,” which profiled the hugely-popular social network Facebook and its founder Mark Zuckerberg. The film received eight academy award nominations. While the story may not have been accurate all the way through, it did have many tech-oriented facts right—like the code that appeared on Zuckerberg’s computer while coding from his Harvard dorm room. Sorkin also wrote the upcoming show “The Newsroom” that airs on HBO June 24.

The Sony biopic should be a much bigger budget film than the unofficial version directed by Joshua Michael Stern, which is set to begin filming sometime this month. However, the unofficial version does feature “Two and a Half Men” star Ashton Kutcher as Jobs, which should attract a good amount of viewers. We saw last weekend how Kutcher looked compared to the Apple co-founder.

Since Sorkin definitely has a good track record, this should be an entertaining film—as long as he does not change the history of Jobs’ life as he did for Zuckerberg during some aspects of “The Social Network.” However, he did a great job with “The Social Network,” and using Isaacon’s hit biography as a guide should make for a good representation of the amazing life of Jobs.

Sony commented on its excitement over the film:

“Steve Jobs’ story is unique: He was one of the most revolutionary and influential men not just of our time, but of all time. There is no writer working in Hollywood today who is more capable of capturing such an extraordinary life for the screen than Aaron Sorkin; in his hands, we’re confident that the film will be everything that Jobs himself was: captivating, entertaining, and polarizing.”