If you’ve been looking for a dedicated editing console for creative programs like Final Cut Pro, Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop, and more, then the Loupedeck + Editing Console might satisfy your needs.

The Loupedeck + was designed specifically for those looking to improve their editing workflow and efficiency through a board with customizable controls. For heavy Lightroom users in particular, this is the way to go if you’re no longer interested in editing with a traditional mouse and keyboard.

Watch our hands-on video for a look at the Loupedeck + Editing Console in action.

Loupedeck + Editing Console features

  • Precisely edit images using the dials and buttons on board
  • Mechanical Keys that allow for precise, tactile clicks
  • Create custom functions for automating your editing workflow
  • Supports Final Cut Pro X, Adobe Lightroom Classic, Adobe Premiere Pro, Capture One Beta, and Skylum: Aurora HDR
  • Custom Mode button that gives the user full control of all dials

Hands-on video: Loupedeck + Editing Console

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The Loupedeck + has free accompanying software for implementing custom functions to custom buttons on the board, and it works pretty well. Depending on what software is being used, there are dozens of options for custom controls per button/dial. All of this allows for a very bespoke editing experience. The software itself functions and performs fluidly as well. Overall, it’s very user friendly.

Editing in Lightroom is where I personally had the best experience as far as out-of-the-box fluidity. The way in which the controls are laid out makes editing in Lightroom a breeze, especially if you’re already a proficient Lightroom user. If the Loupedeck software is actively running, the dial control to software response time is instant. It feels very natural using this console for this program.

Given the way the board is designed, there isn’t going to be a straightforward functional translation for using the console with Final Cut Pro X.  By default, a lot of the controls don’t do much of anything substantially useful or convenient.

You’re going to have to go into the Loupedeck setup software to customize the buttons to your liking. For example, I set the C3 and C4 buttons to select the blade tool and disable clips, as those are two functions I use heavily when editing videos.

Even after days of use for editing, I don’t find the board natural to use for editing videos in Final Cut even after setting my own custom buttons, but I can see this being very beneficial for those who would like to edit videos on a dedicated console. There are a plethora of custom controls made specifically for Final Cut Pro.

9to5Mac’s Take

For $250, some might immediately turn away from a product like this, but that’s not the demographic Loupedeck is catering to. There are hundreds of thousands of people who edit photos and videos for a living, and rely on being as efficient and productive as possible. So the prospect of owning a device like this is a no-brainer for a lot of creatives, and surely a worthwhile investment in their craft.

As far as a next-generation wish list, I’d like to see a few things change. Firstly, a different build material would be welcome. There isn’t anything necessarily wrong with the design, but the plastic body on my unit was very easily scratched.

An aluminum build should be something to consider next time around. I’d also like to see a removable cable implemented that can allow for different cable types to be used and for flexibility in case the cable is damaged. Instead of a non-removable USB type A cable, the next version could have a USB-C port that includes a type C to A cable and a type C to C cable.

What are your thoughts on the Loupedeck +? Is spending the $250 on this console a no-brainer? Leave your thoughts and feedback in the comment section down below!

Jamf