This morning, Bloomberg Businessweek has published the entirety of its interview with Apple CEO Tim Cook. Earlier this week, the magazine gave us a look at its conversation with Cook, Jony Ive, and Craig Federighi, though today’s article is a much more extensive look at the thoughts from Cook.

Notably, Cook discusses the new fingerprint scanner Touch ID system in the iPhone 5s. Cook seems to enjoy that users can unlock their iPhone with the touch of a fingerprint, but he seems to imply that purchases with Touch ID are the bigger picture. He notes that Touch ID can now be used to download items from Apple’s online media stores, but it seems that purchases will become even more important as the technology continues to develop:

You know, the first time that you buy something with your finger, it’s pretty profound. It’s one thing to use it as security. This is really cool, and a lot of people will love it, because they open their phone multiple times a day. But the buying is even a more startling experience, in a way.

Speaking of the features in the new iPhone, Cook goes onto to share some notable details behind the development and integration of the new iOS and the iPhone 5c:

And somebody thought through the wallpaper. Wouldn’t it be great if it was like you were putting on your shirt and your pants, and they actually matched or made some sense with each other? You know? Technology companies don’t think of those things, or, usual technology companies don’t think of those things. Nobody worries about buttons and finishes. Nobody really worries about the experience, and we do. We’re really proud that we do.

Cook adds that the iPhone 5c was not about increasing marketing share or hitting certain lower price points, but it was about giving consumers options, creating a differentiation factor from the iPhone 5c, and expanding the iPhone’s reach.

In addition to Touch ID and the design of the iPhones, Cook discusses Apple’s iOS Duopoly with Google’s Android mobile device operating system. The Apple CEO makes it clear that the mobile phone OS market is a competition between Apple and Google.

For smartphones, I think it’s even more a two-operating-system world today than it was before. Maybe that changes. Maybe it doesn’t, but that is the state of things today. I think that Android is more fragmented than ever and, as a result, when you look at things like customer satisfaction and usage, you see the gap between Android and iOS being huge.

Cook also discusses Android fragmentation:

Yes. And it’s just not growing in the—it’s not like a baby that becomes an infant. It’s not like that. It’s an exponential. It’s a compounding problem. And think about all these people that they’re leaving behind from a customer point of view. People do hold on. Most people hold on to their phones a couple of years. They enter a contract and honor that contract and then upgrade after that two-year period. So in essence, by the time they buy the phone, many of these operating systems are old. They’re not the latest ones by the time people buy. And so by the time they exit, they’re using an operating system that’s three or four years old. That would be like me right now having in my pocket iOS 3. I can’t imagine it.

Besides the interview, Bloomberg has also published an inside-look at the thought process behind the magazine’s cover and some photo shoot outtakes:

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