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Darkroom is an approachable yet powerful photo editor on the iPhone and, as of version 4.0, the iPad where it really shines. Darkroom 4.1 is out today with a collection of new features that help extend the app across iOS.

The photo editor now includes a dedicated Darkroom extension that can be unlocked in the Photos app so you can manipulate your shots while browsing through your photo library — just don’t forget to turn on the extension in the Photos app with the More button in the share sheet to use it after updating.

Here’s what Darkroom offers from its newly added Photos integration:

You can now edit your photos with Darkroom right within the Photos app, or right after capturing a photo, using our Photos Edit Extension. Access the extension from the (…) menu when editing a photo in the Photos app, and you’ll have easy in-place access to the Darkroom editing experience.

As you’d expect, Live Photos are supported, and all the edits you make in the extension will be available for you in Darkroom itself.

Photos isn’t the only system app adding a dose of Darkroom integration. The photo editor also now integrates with Apple’s Files app on the iPhone and iPad so you can have your own digital bucket of edits in the cloud.

The Album Picker gains the ability to launch the native Files app within Darkroom. You can find the new Open button right next to the new Imported smart album which we’ll discuss in more detail below. What’s particularly handy is that the Files app integrates with many third-party storage services which gives you an incredible convenient way to import assets from places like Dropbox right within the app!

Darkroom 4.1 builds on Split Screen support introduced in the first iPad version with newly added Drag and Drop support so you can move images between apps — even in groups. The new version also adds Darkroom as an “Open In…” destination for other apps including Dropbox and Files.

Finally, Darkroom 4.1 has a privacy-focused change for photographers: location information is now stripped from images by default when importing photos. Users can still opt in to retaining location data on shots with a toggle in the app’s settings, but the new default is more conservation.

Darkroom 4.1 for iPhone and iPad is available for free (with in-app purchases to support development and unlock features) on the App Store.

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