Accelerometer Stories May 3, 2015

Apple takes user submitted data for age, height, gender and weight to help it calculate the different data points it provides for workouts and activities, but there is also a way to calibrate Apple Watch to improve the accuracy of the data.

By initiating the calibration process, you can get more accurate readings for calorie, distance, Move, and Exercise estimations in the Watch’s Activity app, and also improved calculations in the Workout app.

By following the steps below, you’ll start calibrating the device’s accelerometer and improve Apple Watch’s accuracy by allowing it to learn your personal stride patterns at various speeds: expand full story

Accelerometer Stories October 4, 2013

3D motion sensor promises instant sports analysis on your iPhone

You’ve long been able to get wireless sports sensors that transmit data to your iPhone: heart-rate, cadence and so on. Zepp Labs has now taken the concept one step further with a small, lightweight sensor that captures data on your baseball, golf or tennis swing, providing an instant analysis and data-logging.

The 17g 6g sensor, which attaches to a glove, contains 2 accelerometers, a gyroscope and compass. The rechargeable battery allows five hours of continuous use. The Zepp Multi-Sport Training System is expected to be available next month for $150.

Sensors definitely appear to be the new black. The iPhone 5s features the M7 chip, which captures sensor data while the main A7 chip takes a nap, and the long-awaited iWatch is widely expected to major on sensors, Apple recently hiring a key Nike Fuel Band designer to work on wearable products.

The M7 chip could do all this right now, but you’d have to duct-tape it to your glove … It’s our bet that the iWatch will offer the same functionality, it’s just a question of how long we might have to wait for that.

Accelerometer Stories November 8, 2012

A student at Goldsmiths, University of London has apparently been able to create an invisible, virtual keyboard for iPhones by using the device’s built-in accelerometer to pick up vibrations caused by tapping or typing on a surrounding surface area. As you can see from the video demonstration above, the “Virbrative” software developed by Florian Kraeutli (on a jailbroken iPhone 4) allows him to measure the strength and frequency of vibrations and then map them to iOS’ onscreen keyboard. The Telegraph spoke with Kraeutli about the software developed for a project on user interfaces:

“The signals I’m collecting are very weak,” said Florian Kraeutli, a computing student at Goldsmiths, who created the system as part of his work on user interfaces.“At the moment it’s more of a proof of concept but if you made the accelerometer more sensitive you could improve the accuracy quite easily.”

In the video above, we see the developer use a keyboard drawn on a piece of paper to train the system before tapping directly on the table underneath. Kraeutli noted users would ideally “train each key, but you can do just a couple.” According The Telegraph, the system “determines the intended key correctly about 80 per cent of the time, so the data is also fed into an auto correct dictionary to ensure the words are spelled correctly.” Kraeutli suggested that access to more powerful accelerometers could allow him to increase the accuracy of the system: expand full story

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