Spotify, an Apple Music competitor and one of the largest music streaming services available, is today hitting a roadblock with bringing its service to India. The music label Warner Music Group today asked Indian court to block Spotify from allowing songs from its artists from being played in the country.

Bloomberg reports that the music label filed the complaint with Bombay High Court and asked for an injunction from an Indian court. Spotify is reportedly planning to launch its music streaming service in India within the next few weeks.

Spotify had been in talks to get a license for Warner’s music but the streaming company “abruptly changed course” by falsely saying that a rule applicable to broadcasters applies to Spotify as well, Warner Music Group said in a statement. “We had no choice but to ask an Indian court for an injunction to prevent this.”

While Spotify continues to struggle with entering the Indian market, Apple Music is already available in the country and is having no issues inking deals with music labels.

Spotify has yet to obtain a license from Warner Music Group but is allegedly planning on using an Indian rule that allows radio stations to offer songs from the music label.

Spotify hasn’t secured a license to music from Warner Music Group but said in an emailed statement that it plans to use an Indian rule that governs radio stations to offer songs from Warner’s publishing division, Warner/Chappell Music, and would continue to assess its options.

Spotify is available in 78 countries worldwide and is home to more than 200 million users, while Apple Music is available in over 100 countries with roughly 50 million subscribers.  Spotify has been wanting to enter the Indian market for quite some time, and already has deals with local record labels, which accounts for the majority of the music listened to by the population.

Outside of expanding its music streaming presence to more countries, the company has recently started adventuring its way into the podcasting scene.

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