No matter if you’re new to the iPad Pro, Air, or mini or need a refresher with your specific model, follow along for a couple of ways to take iPad screenshots including the Apple Pencil shortcut.

Along with all the changes that the modern models bring, the process to take iPad screenshots is different between those with and without a Home button.

And with more models working with the Apple Pencil, there’s also a handy shortcut to take iPad screenshots without having to reach for your tablet’s buttons.

How to take iPad screenshots on any model

On the iPad Pro, Air (4/5th gen), and mini (6th gen):

  1. Press the Top button and a volume button at the same time
  2. Tap the screenshot preview in the bottom left corner to make edits and markup, or long-press on it to share it right away
  3. You can find your screenshot in the Photos app

You can also use the Apple Pencil screenshot shortcut:

  1. Place your Apple Pencil in the bottom left corner of your screen
  2. Swipe up at a diagonal a few inches
  3. Let go to take the screenshot

On iPads with a Home button:

  1. Press the Top button (previously called sleep/wake button) and the Home button at the same time
  2. Tap the screenshot preview to make edits and markup, or long-press for quick share options
  3. You can find your screenshot in the Photos app

If you accidentally take a screenshot or would like to delete one immediately, tap the preview in the bottom left corner, tap Done in the top left corner, then choose Delete Screenshot.

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About the Author

Michael Potuck

Michael is an editor for 9to5Mac. Since joining in 2016 he has written more than 3,000 articles including breaking news, reviews, and detailed comparisons and tutorials.