Apple launched its new Self Service Repair program today, which allows iPhone customers in the United States to access parts and manuals that they can use to repair their own devices – starting with iPhone 12, iPhone 13, and iPhone SE 3. Are you going to use this new program?

With Apple’s new Self Service Repair program, iPhone users can repair components, including the display, battery, and camera. Later this year, the company will also make M1 Mac parts available as well.

The tools and parts available through the Self Service Repair Store are the same as what Apple’s own repair teams are given access to. A complete kit of tools can be rented for a week, priced at $49. These toolkits include the necessary press, screw bits, protective covers, and other materials required to carry out the repair professionally. Individual tools can also be purchased separately to keep.

As 9to5Mac explained earlier today, the pricing of parts varies, depending on the repair and device type. For example, an iPhone 13 Pro display repair bundle is priced at $269. A battery bundle is $71. For context, you can actually get your iPhone battery serviced through Apple for slightly less money – only $69. An Apple screen replacement service for an iPhone 13 costs $279, only $10 more than the Self Service cost.

iFixit also praised Apple Self Service Repair program, although the company thinks it falls short of Right to Repair goals as independent shops can’t purchase key parts without an iPhone serial number or IMEI.

The biggest problem? Apple is doubling down on their parts pairing strategy, enabling only very limited, serial number-authorized repairs. You cannot purchase key parts without a serial number or IMEI. If you use an aftermarket part, there’s an “unable to verify” warning waiting for you. This strategy hamstrings third-party repair with feature loss and scare tactics and could dramatically limit options for recyclers and refurbishers, short-circuiting the circular economy. 

In addition, Apple also makes sure to warn customers that if they wrongly repair their iPhones, AppleCare won’t cover the new issue.

With all that in mind, are you planning to use the new Self Service Repair program? Vote in the poll and share your thoughts in the comments section.

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About the Author

José Adorno

Brazilian tech Journalist. Author at 9to5Mac. Previously at tv globo, the main TV broadcaster in Latin America.

Got tips, feedback, or questions? jose@9to5mac.com