in-cell Stories September 2, 2015

AAPL: 112.34

4.62

Sketchy report: Apple may plan a return to glass-on-glass touchscreens for bezel-free iPhone next year

Digitimes report, which seems to be drawing a lot of conclusions from minimal information, suggests that Apple may be planning a return to glass-on-glass touchscreens for next year’s iPhones. Apple used so-called G/G technology for its early iPhones, switching to in-cell tech for the iPhone 5 onward.

The short piece suggests that the move is mostly motivated by supply constraints for higher-resolution in-cell displays, but also suggests that the rumored plan could be geared towards bezel-free displays. Glass suppliers Corning and Asahi are said to have sent samples to Apple.

G/G touch panels may also help Apple develop bezel-free smartphones as in-cell touch panels reportedly are struggling with touch sensitivity on the edges.

The reasoning here appears to be that as touch sensors are limited to the size of the display, this can result in reduced sensitivity at the edges. G/G displays allow the sensor layer to extend beyond the edges of the display, making them more suitable for edge-to-edge glass designs.

However, Apple originally made the switch to in-cell touchscreens as they allow displays to be thinner and lighter. For now, we’re filing this one under ‘interesting but unsubstantiated rumor.’

Via GforGames

in-cell Stories April 23, 2012

Apple to drop 17-inch MacBooks, slim down iPhone w/ in-cell?

You can read into these reports from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities as much as you want. Kuo claimed this morning that Apple is about to axe the 17-inch MacBook Pro line entirely while introducing a rumored all new MacBook design by Q3 2012 (via MacRumors). Kuo also alleged Apple will adopt in-cell display technology to help slim down the next-generation iPhone by up to 1.4mm to under 8mm. IHS told Wired earlier about the advantages of in-cell displays:

“The advantage of in-cell is that you’re streamlining the manufacturing process, so in time you should be able to drive efficiencies and reduce cost.” IHS analyst Rhoda Alexander told Wired. “Additionally, by reducing the number of layers, you reduce the size and thickness of the device, making it thinner and lighter.”

According to the report, Kuo said in-cell would provide a reduction of approximately 0.5mm, while other reductions could come from the battery and a thinner metal casing on the back.

Since Apple’s smartphone competitors have generally slimmed down their high-end offerings to 7-8mm, Apple needs to make a leap forward from 4S’ 9.3mm thickness. We believe Apple will aim at 8mm or below (at least 1.4mm slimmer) for iPhone 5, in a bid to ensure brisk sales through 2014, while peers will also continue to introduce increasingly slim models next year… As such, all iPhone 4S components that account for thickness must be slimmer, specifically, touch panel, battery and casing. Moreover, a marginal amount of space is required between the three parts for the sakes of assembly tolerance and thermal expansion of components.

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