In the first official statement about Apple’s decision to allow Tim Cook and other senior executives to be interviewed for Becoming Steve Jobs, company spokesman Steve Dowling said it was from a sense of responsibility to Steve’s memory.

After a long period of reflection following Steve’s death, we felt a sense of responsibility to say more about the Steve we knew. We decided to participate in Brent and Rick’s book because of Brent’s long relationship with Steve, which gave him a unique perspective on Steve’s life. The book captures Steve better than anything else we’ve seen, and we are happy we decided to participate.

Apple had initially refused interview requests by authors Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli, the company taking 18 months to change its mind, reports the NY Times … 

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The pair first approached Apple about the unauthorized biography in 2012, and were told the company would not give any interviews.

“I think our patience and quiet perseverance was what eventually won them over,” said Mr. Schlender, who covered Mr. Jobs for almost 25 years.

Tim Cook has been extremely critical of Walter Isaacson’s earlier biography, simply entitled Steve Jobs, authorized by Steve before his death and published afterwards. Cook said that the portrayal of Steve in Isaaccon’s book did a “tremendous disservice” to him, failing to capture the man he had known. Cook revealed in an interview that Steve had refused Cook’s offer to donate part of his liver.

Apple has been actively promoting Becoming Steve Jobs on Twitter and on iBooks, describing it as the “only book about Steve recommended by the people who knew him best.” The company has made a free sample of the biography available on iBooks.

The book, which goes on sale tomorrow, is available for pre-order now from iBooks ($14.99) and Kindle, with the pre-order price of the hardcover edition currently at $19.83 instead of the regular $30. An audiobook is also available.

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