ssl

Update: The bug has been fixed in OS X 10.9.2

Security consultant Aldo Cortesi said in a blog post (via ZDNet) that it took him less than a day to exploit the goto fail bug in OS X to capture all SSL traffic, and that there’s a good chance he isn’t the first to have done so – an implicit suggestion that the vulnerability may already be being used in man-in-the-middle attacks.

I’ve confirmed full transparent interception of HTTPS traffic on both IOS (prior to 7.0.6) and OSX Mavericks. Nearly all encrypted traffic, including usernames, passwords, and even Apple app updates can be captured. This includes:

  • App store and software update traffic
  • iCloud data, including KeyChain enrollment and updates
  • Data from the Calendar and Reminders
  • Find My Mac updates
  • Traffic for applications that use certificate pinning, like Twitter … 

The proof of concept was pulled together from information in the public domain. Cortesi said that he modified an existing man-in-the-middle proxy, mitmproxy, to exploit the bug. He tweeted a series of screenshots showing captured SSL data, including iCloud keychain traffic and data from software update.

It’s difficult to over-state the seriousness of this issue. With a tool like mitmproxy in the right position, an attacker can intercept, view and modify nearly all sensitive traffic. This extends to the software update mechanism itself, which uses HTTPS for deployment.

Cortesi says that he will not supply further details of how he achieved the interception until Apple has patched OS X.