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GforGames is citing a Chinese web forum for a rumor that the iPhone 6 camera will get a bump from 8MP to 13MP as Apple switches to to an improved version of the Sony Exmor sensor. The Sony Exmor IMX220 is a larger 1/2.3-inch sensor that can support up to 20MP, but Apple is said to be planning to use it in its 13MP incarnation.

While a Chinese web forum is generally as unreliable a source as you can get, GoforGames claims that this one has a good track-record with Sony-related rumors … 

It should be noted that Apple has always opted for relatively modest megapixel counts for the very good reason that the more pixels you cram into a given sensor size, the worse the low-light performance. An 8MP image allows for high-quality prints in poster sizes, so there has so far been little argument for joining the megapixel arms race – and rumors that it won’t do so. Apple also generally only boosts the camera specs in S model phones.

However, as we move toward the era of 4K monitors (with an Apple one likely somewhere in the works), it’s possible that Apple may have decided that the time is right to boost the resolution – and a larger sensor size should allow it to retain the iPhone’s low-light capabilities.

An earlier rumor that the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 will have a battery in the 1800-1900mAh range got a boost today when NWE posted a photo (shown in full below) of what is claimed to be the battery for the 4.7-inch iPhone, showing a capacity of 1810mAh. This was said to be a necessary compromise to make the new phone slimmer.

If real, this would be a 16 percent improvement over the iPhone 5s, but the additional juice will likely be needed to power the larger screen, suggesting that battery-life may remain roughly the same. However, it has also been rumored that Apple is favoring power efficiency over performance boosts in the new model iPhone, so it’s still possible that we’ll see improved battery life.

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Among the other claimed iPhone 6 parts we’ve seen recently are a scratch test of a sapphire display; both photos and video of the back of the phone; the LCD bracket; the chassis; and a ‘more durable’ Touch ID sensor.