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Apple announced on Tuesday that iOS 7 will be publicly available on September 18th. The revamped OS moves completely away from the realistic designs of the past six generations, dropping almost all “artificial shadows” (as Apple SVP Craig Federighi called them), gloss, and even button borders. Instead, the Jony Ive-inspired interface features an entirely rethought design language that focuses heavily on large icons, lightweight fonts, whitespace, transparency, and conservative use of color.

We previously took a look at what some of Apple’s own in-house apps could look like when redesigned for iOS 7. During Apple’s September 10th event, Federighi flashed up a slide displaying the upcoming iOS 7 updates for many third-party applications. None of the apps were labeled, but we’ve tracked down names for most of them.

The apps featured are:

There are also two apps we haven’t been able to identify. If you happen to know what those three are, drop us a note in the comments and let us know.

Some of the above apps feature only minor changes. The Twitter header has been flattened, Mint’s header has changed to white, and Facebook’s header has been flattened and its tab bar (which only some users are seeing as part of an A/B test) has been changed to white. Other than that, those apps remain largely the same.

The New Yorker, however, quotes a source as saying that Twitter’s app will not look like what is pictured above from Apple’s keynote.

Twitter’s new iPhone app, like many other new apps, will match the iOS 7’s creative direction: it will look cleaner and feel more alive. For instance, in the redesigned app, according to a source, Twitter will dispense with its hallmark menu—four buttons at the bottom of the screen—which lets users toggle between different sections of the service: Home, Connect, Discover, and Me. Instead, users will swipe from stream to stream to stream.

Other apps have seen a more dramatic overhaul. NBC’s home page has been revamped, and 500px appears to have been redesigned almost from scratch with a brand new color scheme. OpenTable also looks like it has been entirely redone.

Thanks to everyone who helped us track down the names of the apps in the photo above.