Tim Cook Overview Updated August 1, 2016

Tim Cook

Everything you need to know about Apple's CEO

Tim Cook was appointed CEO in 2011 when Steve Jobs stepped away from the company as his health worsened. Cook was handpicked by Jobs to be his replacement, having served as a close friend of Jobs during their entire career together.

A graduate of Auburn University with a degree in industrial engineering, Cook earned his Masters from Duke University’s School of business. Prior to joining Apple, Cook spent 12 years at IBM, then served as the Chief Operating Officer of Intelligent Electronics. He then had a short stint at Compaq.

Cook first joined Apple in 1998 after being recruited by Jobs. Cook remarked in a commencement address at Auburn University that, five minutes into his interview with Jobs, he knew he wanted to join Apple. “My intuition already knew that joining Apple was a once in a lifetime opportunity to work for the creative genius,” he remarked.

At Apple, Cook started out as senior vice president of worldwide operating. He served as interim CEO during in 2009 while Steve Jobs was on medical leave. In 2011, Cook again stepped in to lead day-to-day operations while Jobs was ill, before ultimately being named CEO permanently just before the death of Jobs.

Cook has been very outspoken on a variety of social issues, including the need to protect user data and privacy, as evident by his vocal refusal to unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino gunmen. Cook has also voiced his displeasure with controversial legislation that enables LGBT discrimination in a handful of states in the Untied States. Likewise, Cook has frequently called on the United States Congress to pass LGBT protection legislation. He became the first openly gay CEO of a Fortune 500 company in 2014, as well. Cook has led Apple in the San Francisco Pride Parade in recent years.

View all Tim Cook-related articles below:

603 Tim Cook stories

February 2010 - June 2016

Tim Cook Stories June 28

AAPL: 93.59

1.55
Stock Chart

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is not happy with Tim Cook’s fundraiser for House Speaker Paul Ryan today. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that the Democratic Party leader commented when asked about the event this morning that the Apple CEO is being advised poorly:

“Poor Tim. What a nice guy he is, but somebody gave him bad advice,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, said at the end of an animated 15-minute phone interview Monday evening. “He probably doesn’t think that much about politics.”

Politico reported the Cook political fundraiser last week, which benefits Paul Ryan as well as other Republican Party members seeking reelection in the House of Representatives.

expand full story

Tim Cook Stories June 20

AAPL: 95.10

-0.23
Stock Chart

Apple may not be playing ball with the Republican Party’s upcoming convention, but CEO Tim Cook is reportedly set to hold a fundraiser for Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan next week. Politico reports that Apple wants to “strengthen its relationships with key Republicans” like Ryan despite its apparent opposition to Donald Trump, the GOP presidential nominee.

expand full story

Tim Cook Stories June 13

AAPL: 97.34

-1.49
Stock Chart
9to5toys 

Tim Cook Stories June 8

AAPL: 98.94

-0.09
Stock Chart

Tim Cook Stories June 3

AAPL: 97.92

0.20
Stock Chart

Update: I referred to the rather misleading headline the Guardian had chosen, and Segall has now posted on his own site that “the Guardian chose to give it a click-bait headline that contradicted my point of view.”

Ken Segall, the former Apple ad consultant who coined the iMac name, wrote the copy for the famous ‘Think different’ campaign and authored the book Insanely Simple, says that Apple is beginning to lose touch with its heritage of simplicity. He gave his assessment of Apple’s ‘state of simplicity’ in a piece for the Guardian.

Though Apple’s customers remain fiercely loyal, the natives are getting restless. A growing number of people are sensing that Tim Cook’s Apple isn’t as simple as Steve’s Apple. They see complexity in expanding product lines, confusing product names, and the products themselves.

While the Guardian‘s headline makes the piece seem entire critical, it’s actually very balanced …

expand full story

9to5google 

Submit a Tip

cancel

Submitting a tip constitutes permission to publish and syndicate. Please view our tips policy or see all contact options.

Powered by WordPress.com VIP