login Stories October 13, 2014

Hackers claim to have a database of nearly 7 million Dropbox credentials, service denies it was breached

A database containing login information for nearly 7 million users of the private cloud storage provider Dropbox has been accessed by hackers, according to a partial dump posted on Pastebin earlier this evening (via The Next Web). However, Dropbox has issued a statement denying that this breach occurred on its end, saying that Dropbox itself was not attacked, but rather a third-party service that had stored user credentials:

Dropbox has not been hacked. These usernames and passwords were unfortunately stolen from other services and used in attempts to log in to Dropbox accounts. We’d previously detected these attacks and the vast majority of the passwords posted have been expired for some time now. All other remaining passwords have been expired as well.

login Stories October 8, 2014

 

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Apple has sent an email to users of its two-factor authentication system reminding them of an upcoming change to the feature that will take effect tomorrow. Originally the requirement for app-specific passwords was supposed to start on the first of the month, but Apple has informed users that it will begin tomorrow instead. The system to generate and use these passwords is already in place.

App-specific passwords allow you to log into applications that don’t support two-factor logins, such as most email clients or other apps that may want to access your iCloud data. You can create these one-time-use passwords from the Apple ID website. Once you’ve generated the password, just plug it into the app you want to use and you’re all set.

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login Stories March 13, 2014

The popular password manager 1Password has been updated with one of the most-requested features: the ability to edit entries within the browser extension, 1Password mini, rather than having to use the main app.

It also promises much better matching of logins to subdomains, so that your stored logins should work more of the time. Previously the app would often fail to recognise subdomains as being part of the same site, so automatic login would not be available when you jumped straight to a particular section of a site, forcing you to login manually then create a new entry.

AgileBits describes version 4.2.1 as “a huge update with over 30 new features,” which are detailed below the fold …  expand full story

Sylvania HomeKit Light Strip

login Stories April 7, 2012

TL;DR: By popular demand, we are rolling out 9to5Forums.com built on the Vanilla platform. As part of this new structure, we are moving our comments going forward to Vanilla, as well. Single sign up for both is quick and easy (including login with Twitter/Facebook/Open ID, etc.). Oh, and there will be prizes!

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login Stories December 29, 2011

Much like the somewhat controversial face unlock feature built-in to Google’s Galaxy Nexus smartphone, a new patent application reveals Apple too is working on similar, but more advanced user detection solutions. As PatentlyApple pointed out, Apple noted these recognition systems could land in a future iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or MacBook.

The basics of the patent entitled “Low Threshold Face Recognition,” is to allow a user to unlock a device—such an iPhone or iPad—using facial recognition. Apple’s solution could allow the device’s camera to recognize the user even when the device is in sleep mode. In other words, the device’s camera would remain active when sleeping, detect the user, and unlock the device without having to press the sleep/wake button. This could, in theory, allow a user to bypass the current Slide to Unlock feature.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the system would be the ability for the device’s settings to be customized depending on the user. For example, when detecting a specific user, iOS could set personalized wallpapers, notification settings, and custom configurations for apps. This would provide multiple user logins, allowing iOS users to easily share a device among family or coworkers.

Apple’s system would differ from other face recognition systems by ignoring face biometrics. As PatentlyApple explained, “The face recognition techniques are based on a simple, weighted difference map, rather than traditional (and computationally expensive) correlation matching.” Apple’s system could detect “high information portions” of a face such as the eyes, mouth, or the tip of a nose. In addition, an “orange-distance filter” could be applied to determine variations in skin tone and detect the “likely presence” of a user. This could detect the distance between the device and the user’s face, as well as the user’s “level of attentiveness.”

In 2010, before the iPad launch, The Wall Street Journal reported Apple was experimenting with the ability to recognize individual users with the device’s camera. Today’s patent was originally filed in 2009.

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