Developer hacks his Samsung Series 7 to run OS X Lion

Samsung’s Series 7, originally intended for Windows 7, has been hacked to run a Hackintosh version of OS X Lion, a user on the tonymacx86 forums highlighted today. Awkward, considering the whole Samsung vs Apple fight. As you can see in the video above, the version of Lion runs relatively smoothly, but the big issue is an external monitor is needed to display the video. The user highlights the tools needed:

8GB USB KEY, mini-HDMI to HDMI cable/adapter, USB Keyboard and mouse. After you make a UniBeast USB key you have some space still left on it so I made a folder and downloaded MultiBeast 4.1.0: Lion Edition.

If you’ve got a Series 7 laying around and are tired of the bleh Windows, you should definitely try this hack out (if you’ve got the technical know-how). With specs close to the MacBook Air — an 11.6-inch display, 64GB SSD, and i5 processor — this device seems pretty perfect to run full on OS X in a mobile setting. It also gives you a little more horsepower than an iPad 2, though that’s like comparing Apples and Oranges.

For all of the technical details, hit up the tonymacx86 forums. We’ve already shared our thoughts on the Hackintosh community, and we’re certainly proponents of what they’re doing. We’re going to keep an eye out as this project gets more bug fixes, specifically the screen issue. Luckily, the developer says he is committed to working on this project.

New iOS security exploit lets apps read users’ information by executing unsigned code

Security expert Charlie Miller has found a flaw in code signing on iOS devices (via Forbes) that allows developers to sneak malware apps onto the App Store without Apple’s detection. The malware can then be used to read user’s contacts, make the phone vibrate or sound a ringtone, steal user’s photos, and more whenever the developer chooses. Sketchy!

To shed more light on the exploit Miller is giving a talk at the SysCan conference in Taiwan next week, but he does a good job in showing it off in the video above. Miller isn’t a novice to iOS and Mac security by any means. In 2008 Miller broke into the MacBook Air in two minutes through Safari and more.

Users would definitely be taken by surprise, seeing as we’re all pretty comfortable with how secure Apple keeps the App Store with the company’s review process. Sadly, it looks like any app could be used to harm users. For now, we suggest you keep away from lesser-known apps and developers until Apple issues a fix for the exploit.

Miller’s app has been both removed from the App Store and his developer account has been closed. At any rate, this was definitely a nice find.