iPad Air higher-tech but actually cheaper to produce than iPad 3, says research firm

ipad-air-callout

Research firm IHS, which previously dismantled the iPhone 5s and 5c to calculate component costs, has now done the same with the iPad Air.

It concludes that while the technology in the iPad Air is significantly more advanced than in the iPad 3 (for some reason the company skipped the iPad 4), the total production cost is actually lower, reports AllThingsD.

The firm says Apple’s iPad Air [...] costs between $274 and $361 to build depending on model. The [...] total component cost of the base model, at $274, is still $42 cheaper than the entry-level third-generation iPad …

Read more

Apple confirms that 12W adapter will charge iPads quicker than older 10W adapters

The morning of Apple’s iPad mini event earlier this week, we told you there was a handful of new accessories coming including four new Lightning adapters and a 12W USB power adapter. We didn’t hear much about them during the event, but the new cables and adapters have hit Apple’s online store now, including a Lightning Digital AV adapter and Lightning to VGA adapter, with most shipping in “2-3 weeks”.

On the product page for the new 12W USB charger, Apple confirmed it would indeed ship with Retina iPads. With the new fourth-gen replacing the third-gen iPad—that would essentially cover just the iPad 4. It is, however, selling the adapter by itself for $19 online and listing compatibility with iPad 2, iPhone 4S, and iPod touch fifth-gen and up. Many readers have wondered whether the adapter would allow for faster charging with the iPad 3 and fourth-gen iPad. A big complaint among third-gen iPad users is that the device took up several more hours to charge than previous generations due to its larger battery. Also, on Apple’s discussion forums, some users asked if a software update would be required for the iPad 3 to draw additional power.

When we asked Apple about the 12W adapters, we were told the following:

Read more

Top places to trade a third-generation, not-so ‘new’ iPad for cash or credit

So…I have the new iPad, err, the third-generation iPad, and its value tanked by 30 percent to 50 percent in the last 24 hours thanks to the fourth-generation iPad and iPad mini unveiling at the California Theatre yesterday.

I now have a few decisions to make. I can keep my iPad and wait for a larger update in the fifth-generation iPad. I could also trade my iPad for money or credit to buy the fourth-generation iPad, or I can even use the trade-in money for my iPad to get the iPad mini and then keep the extra dough for myself.

I actually decided to take a fourth option: I am going to trade my not-so new iPad and my dusty ‘ole first-generation iPad for credit to go toward the fourth-generation iPad. This way, I will be up to date. I will also get more bang for my trade-in buck when Apple releases the fifth-generation iPad (next fall?), as I will have the latest version. As for the iPad mini, I guess I will have to shell out extra money for it. I could always trade my old iPhones to get cash for it, though…but more on that here.

9to5Mac has you covered, for whichever path you choose, as we have compiled another list of the top trade-in places for cash or credit.

Check out the top 13 list below.

Read more

Why does the new iPad continue charging after it hits 100 percent?

Since the launch of the third-generation iPad, Dr. Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies Corporation, has put the device through its paces testing just about every aspect of its “resolutionary” new Retina display. The lengthy report provided a detailed comparison of the new iPad’s display versus the iPad 2 and iPhone 4.

In a running time time of the new iPad’s battery, Dr. Soneira found its “batteries do not actually reach full charge when 100% is shown,” and noted up to an extra hour of charging is required before reaching full capacity. We already discovered that the third-generation iPad’s new 42.5-watt-hour battery takes considerably longer to charge than the iPad 2—up to several hours. One explanation suggested is that Apple is trying to shorten the amount of time people think it takes to charge to line up with iPad 2 expectations. Soneira found the new iPad running no applications at maximum brightness lasted for 5.8 hours in comparison to the iPad 2 at 7.2 hours.

He did not go into detail about his findings in the report, but Soneira provided an explanation of the charging issue below:

Read more

New iPad jailbroken within hours

That did not take long. Just hours after today’s launch of the new iPad, jailbreaker MuscleNerd posted (via iFans) screenshots of what he claimed is a jailbroken third-generation iPad. Do not get too excited, because MuscleNerd warned there is “still lots of work to do.” Therefore, the jailbreak is far from prime time. There is “No ETA,” but he provided screenshots of Cydia running for further proof that it is on the way. We will keep you updated as progress is made.

Over on the Dev-Team Blog, a new post noted: “It’s impossible to predict how or when these things turn out,” but the team also highlighted the progress made so far with iOS 5.1, as well as the possibility of jailbreaking the new iPad.

Go past the break for the full breakdown.

Read more

Apple launches gestures-heavy iPhoto for iPad, can tell you weather in images. Available today for $4.99

In what many might call a long overdue move, Apple finally ported the photo management application iPhoto to iPad. The release of the software completes a trio of the most important iLife apps that are now available on the iPad: iMovie, GarageBand, and now iPhoto. The app supports images up to 19-megapixels. It also sports many familiar and popular features, including the auto-enhance tool, social sharing through Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, email, and more.

The iPhoto app is aimed at people who “want to do more with your photos.” One aspect immediately becomes clear: iPhoto for iPad is gestures-heavy (per an extensive live demo Apple’s Chief Architect for Photo and Video Randy Ubillos gave on stage).

You can use the new bezel gesture —a first for an Apple-made iPad app— to swipe from the left side of the screen to look at other images in the album. From there, just tap on an image to bring the editing interface up. When you want to bring in the thumbnail view, just swipe from the side again.

Another cool feature: Double-tapping a single image tells iPhoto to scan your entire library and compare all the images to find the ones that look similar. You can also beam photos between devices over-the-air, tap a specific area to adjust it, touch, and drag to brighten or tweak saturation, and more.

However, when it comes down to heavy image editing, the iPhoto app does not disappoint. For example, brush palettes include tools such as red-eye, saturation, and lighten. Other notables include sharpen, soften, darken, and a general repair tool. Meanwhile, the effects gallery includes black and white, vignette, tilt-shift, watercolor, and more.

More information is available below.

Read more