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The official Steve Jobs biopic, written by Aaron Sorkin, was shown at the Telluride Film Festival for a preliminary screening ahead of its cinema debut on October 9th. The reviews are in and seem to be very good indeed. Variety called it “a terrific actors’ showcase and an incorrigibly entertaining ride that looks set to be one of the fall’s early must-see attractions.”

The film is just over two hours long, with Michael Fassbender who plays Jobs, being a standout success. The Guardian described Fassbender playing the lead role as a transformative experience with others already lobbying Fassbender for an Oscar for the part. We’ve compiled some quotes from various reviews below. Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak seems to like the film as well …

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This is an Apple promotional walk down memory lane that recounts the creation of the company, the Apple I, and the Apple II with commentary from Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and others.

Presumably this was produced in the 1980s.

“Apple II forever and ever, bringin’ the rainbow to you…”

February 2

Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 11.04.44 AM

Photo via @motro68

As filming for the announced Steve Jobs biopic continues, first at Steve Jobs’ childhood home, then at the Flint Center where the original Macintosh was unveiled, the first photos of Michael Fassbender and Seth Rogen as Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak have appeared.

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December 8, 2014

November 10, 2014

October 30, 2014

Variety reports that actor Seth Rogen has been cast to play Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic from Sony:

Seth Rogen has been set to star as Steve Wozniak opposite Christian Bale in Sony’s Steve Jobs biopic.

We learned earlier this month that Christian Bale, who starred in the recent Batman trilogy, will portray Steve Jobs in the Aaron Sorkin directed film. Sorkin later confirmed the report adding that Christian Bale didn’t have to audition for the role in the film.

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May 17, 2012

Reuters reports on comments from Aaron Sorkin, the screen writer of the upcoming Steve Jobs biopic from Sony. Sorkin says that the film will not be much like the biography, and that while he knows what he is not going to put into the screenplay, he knows “so little about what [he is] going to write.”

“I know so little about what I am going to write. I know what I am not going to write. It can’t be a straight ahead biography because it’s very difficult to shake the cradle-to-grave structure of a biography, ” Sorkin told reporters at a news conference for his upcoming HBO drama “The Newsroom.”

Sorkin, also known as the writer behind the movie The Social Network, also said that he will move his full attention onto the Steve Jobs movie project late next month (June). Perhaps most interestingly, Reuters also reports that Sony has hired the Apple co-founder and long time friend of Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, as a “tutor” for the film. Wozniak will presumably provide excellent insight into the early years of Apple and Jobs.

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December 5, 2011

Steve Wozniak illustration by Charis Tsevis

Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple and the original architect of the Apple I and Apple II computers in the mid-1970s, is a self-proclaimed Android fan (and of course he loves his iPhone, too). He has been quoted as predicting that Android will win smartphone wars (although he hopes Google’s platform will never beat iPad) and was one of the first customers in the United States to get their hands on the Galaxy Nexus handset.

Wozniak visited Bangalore yesterday, a city in south central India and capital of the country’s state of Karnataka, to speak to young entrepreneurs. AS always, everyone’s favorite geek had interesting thoughts to share, particularly on the state of mobile industry today. reported that the Woz likened today’s smartphones to the Apple III, an ill-fated computer of the 1908s that was largely considered a failure in the market:

If the guys at Apple had built the machine that they would love, it would have been successful. It came instead from formulas from Apple executives. Marketing people were in charge and some very bad decisions got made, in my opinion. There were hardware failures. You put out a product that has failures right away, and even if you fix it a year later, it just doesn’t sell. It’s the same thing with any smartphone today. It comes out and it has something horribly wrong about it. You can fix everything wrong about it, and it still won’t sell. It has missed its window of opportunity.

He hasn’t had time to read his copy of the authorized Steve Jobs biography he keeps on his Kindle, iPhone, iPad and computer (plus, he owns a hard cover) and said the death of Steve Jobs was shocking, but not hard emotionally “because we had expected his death for so long”, although Steve being such an important part of his life means he sometimes “tear up”.

He also said this on Apple’s first computer products:

The Apple III was a failure, the LISA was a failure, and the Macintosh was a failure. It was only by modifying the Macintosh hugely and over time that we made it a good computer.

And this on the failure of the Apple III:

If the guys at Apple had built the machine that they would love, it would have been successful. It came instead from formulas from Apple executives. Marketing people were in charge and some very bad decisions got made, in my opinion. There were hardware failures. You put out a product that has failures right away, and even if you fix it a year later, it just doesn’t sell. It’s the same thing with any smartphone today. It comes out and it has something horribly wrong about it. You can fix everything wrong about it, and it still won’t sell. It has missed its window of opportunity. 

According to Walter Isaacson’s Steve Jobs bio, Wozniak drew upon himself the wrath of Steve Jobs for inventing the universal remote outside the Apple umbrella. Wozniak commented on the remote incident:

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October 14, 2011


October 6, 2011

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak reflects on his relationship with Steve Jobs in an interview with The Associated Press this morning. 
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May 26, 2011

Remember Steve Wozniak’s white iPhone 4? Then you remember we discovered it was a do-it-yourself modification. The Woz himself admitted to buying parts from Fei Lam (no relation to Gizmodo’s editor Brian Lam whatsoever), a New York teenager who banked a cool $130,000 selling those sought-after white front and back plates on the web. When the story blew up and Apple presumably sent its legal rottweilers after the kid, he shuttered the site and disappeared under the radar.

MacRumors discovered that Apple yesterday filed a lawsuit against Lam and his parents who “aided and abetted him” in an alleged infringement and dilution of Apple’s trademarks. They’re seeking damages and demanding that Lam hands over all profits from the sale. At the same time, the company has filed a voluntary dismissal, leaving the door open to a possible settlement. From Apple’s lawsuit:

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October 18, 2010

Woz’s wrist says it all. Thanks, Thomas.

August 4, 2010

Thankfully he speaks slow enough for us to comprehend. via


April 25, 2010

We really hate to hear this kind of thing.  Steve Wozniak, writing on Gizmodo (surprising given the timing in its own right!), reports that in the wake of the leaked iPhone mess, Apple has fired an engineer who showed Woz the 3G iPad the night of the release of the iPad.  Known only as ‘AJ’, the engineer wasn’t supposed to take the 3G iPad off of Cupertino’s campus until after midnight.

But I can tell you that the test engineer who showed me an iPad after midnight, for 2 minutes, during the iPad launch was indeed fired. I opted to spend 2 minutes with Numbers on this iPad, trying some stunts I’d seen on Apple’s website demo video. I was not told that it was a 3G model and I had no way to know that. I was told that this engineer had to wait until midnight to show it outside of Apple’s secure area. And I’m an Apple employee who he was showing it to. My guess is that he was allowed to take the iPad outside of the secure area but still not supposed to show it.

Woz didn’t realize that the Black bar on the top was an indicator that the iPad in question was a 3G model.  Woz also thought that, because he was an Apple employee, he wouldn’t get the engineer fired.  I mean, without Woz, none of us would be talking about Apple anything right now.

Woz describes the engineer as:

I never knew him before. He resembled myself and Steve Jobs when we were that age, and my younger son who programs for NASA. He’s a kind of person I would always enjoy talking with. A.J. said that he had an email allowing his team to use the iPad outside of secure areas on April 3 (after midnight, which A.J. waited for). I was surprised but he had an email. If I’d known it was a 3G model, which I didn’t, I probably would have saved his job by telling him he can’t show it. And he only showed it to me..


February 5, 2010

In this clip Apple co-founder, Steve Wozniak, talks engagingly about how he added color to computing.

For his achievements at Apple Computer, Steve has won numerous accolades, including the National Medal of Technology by the President of the United States in 1985.

In 2000 Steve was inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame and was awarded the prestigious Heinz Award for Technology, The Economy and Employment for “single-handedly designing the first personal computer and for then redirecting his lifelong passion for mathematics and electronics toward lighting the fires of excitement for education in grade school students and their teachers.”

See more clips at Fora TV. (Looks like this may have taken place late last year, but this video’s only been in circulation a few hours, far as we can tell).

February 8, 2009

Wow.  Just Wow.  Macrumors reports that ABC’s cast list for the upcoming season of their reality TV show Dancing with the Stars includes one Mr. Steve ‘Woz’ Wozniak.  We 5h1t you not.


Apple co-founder, philanthropist

A Silicon Valley icon and philanthropist for the past three decades, Steve Wozniak, a.k.a. "The Woz," helped shape the computer industry with his design of Apple’s first line of products, the Apple I and II, and influenced the popular Macintosh. After leaving Apple Computer Inc. in 1985, Wozniak was involved in various business and philanthropic ventures, focusing primarily on computer capabilities in schools and stressing hands-on learning and encouraging creativity for students. In 2000, he was inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame and was awarded the prestigious Heinz Award for Technology, The Economy and Employment. Wozniak is also a published author with the release of his New York Times Best Selling autobiography, iWoz: From Computer Geek to Cult Icon, in September 2006.


Hope this doesn’t interfere with his new day job.

Go Woz!  The competition below.




October 7, 2008

Apple co-founder (in picture to the right, to the left is Steve Jobs) Steve Wozniak warns that the iPod’s days are numbered in an interview with UK newspaper, the Telegraph.

"The iPod has sort of lived a long life at number one. Things like, that if you look back to transistor radios and Walkmans, they kind of die out after a while", Wozniak warned.

"It’s kind of like everyone has got one or two or three. You get to a point when they are on display everywhere, they get real cheap and they are not selling as much," he added.  

One way around this inevitable consequence of change may be to slow down, Wozniak advised: "It is time for the whole computer industry to maybe have a bit of a slowdown. For twenty years we have been in this replacement and upgrade market," he said.

Woz was also critical of Apple’s tight control over iPhone development, warning, "Consumers aren’t getting all they want when companies are very proprietary and lock their products down. I would like to write some more powerful apps than what you’re allowed." 

There’s also a mumbled future product warning, where Woz, "let slip that Apple’s future could lie in an ‘iWatch’". The Telegraph doesn’t say any more…

So what is the iWatch? We say this fictional product will contain GPS sensing and a colour screen. It will be voice-activated, host a built-in phone and offer email access on the go, (read-only). What would you expect from the iWatch?

(Incidentally, we think the Woz was joking about the iWatch, but there you go.)


September 5, 2008

 “Back in 1984, Japanese manga artist Mitsuru Sugaya wrote a fun comic book for kids about the birth of Apple. It was originally published as a two-part series in a popular manga compilation called Koro Koro Comics in May and June that year, but Sugaya published the story in its entirety on his blog on July 11th—iPhone launch day in Japan. 

"The year before I wrote this, I went to Silicon Valley and stopped by Apple HQ," he writes.

Kudos to BoingBoing for this one.



The Apple II Story on Sugaya’s blog (Japanese)


July 18, 2008

Steve Wozniak says education was one of the key uses he saw for computers from the beginning. Filmed at Blackboard Inc.s Las Vegas conference this week, here he talks about his passion for education and the early days of Apple.


August 26, 2007

Steve jobs hacks phones

The latest news around the net is the iPhone hack that allows you to take the sim-locked iPhone off of AT&T and use it freely on any GSM network – making the must-have device more accessible.   This is a boon to people (like us) abroad who love the iPhone but don’t want to pay AT&T’s exorbitant roaming extortion fees. Apple hasn’t taken an official stance on this issue perhaps because of a little bit of history. Maybe you’ve seen the picture to the right on Steve Wozniak’s official website:

Yep.  That is Steve Jobs on the left, but the most startling thing in this picture (besides Woz’s ‘do) is that young Jobs is playing with a piece of contralband called the “Blue Box.”  What is a Blue Box?  From Wikipedia:

An early phreaking tool, the blue box is an electronic device that simulates a telephone operator‘s
dialing console. It functions by replicating the tones used to switch long-distance calls and using them to route the user’s own call, bypassing the normal switching mechanism. The most typical use of a blue box was to place free telephone calls – inversely, the Black Box enabled one to receive calls which were free to the caller. The blue box no longer works in most western nations, as modern switching systems are now digital and no longer use the in-band signaling which the blue box emulates. Instead, signaling occurs on an out-of-band channel which cannot be accessed from the line the caller is using (called Common Channel Interoffice Signaling (CCIS))….

Some of the more famous pranksters were Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs, founders of Apple Computer. On one occasion Wozniak dialed Vatican City and identified himself as Henry Kissinger (imitating Kissinger’s German accent) and asked to speak to the Pope (who was sleeping at the time).1].

We love the Steves, but it is well documented that the Apple founders got their start by hacking AT&T (from 1971-1975 AT&T was still a monopoly – just like it will be in 2010).  

Therefore, it is going to be extremely difficult for Apple to take the moral high ground on the current controversy surrounding the young entrepreneurs who are hacking the iPhone.  AT&T has already started hitting back at the companies that offer to untether the iPhone from the wannabe monopoly.  

Hey AT&T, why not put those attorney fees into better service for your customers and lower prices for your roamers? That would be a better way of keeping customers, in our opinion.

Update: It turns out that the duo not only built the illegal boxes but assembled them and SOLD them on Cal Berkley’s campus for around $150. This profit was some of the money that was used to start Apple!!

In 1971 Steve ‘Woz’ Wozniak designed a device called the ‘Blue Box’. It allowed — of course illegal — phone calls free of charge by faking the signals used by the phone companies. His friend Steve Jobs instantly realized that there must be a huge market for something that useful. He bought the parts for $40, Woz built the boxes and Jobs sold them to his fellow students at the University of California in Berkeley for $150. To demonstrate the ‘product’ to some students, Woz once posed as Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and called the Vatican. Allegedly he played his role so well that they told him the pope was sleeping but if he requested they would awake him. Woz got nervous and hung up.

More Here:

The Wozniak/Jobs blue boxes were perfected and the business partnership between Jobs and Wozniak was born with Jobs working with Wozniak to sell the blue-boxes. They had some success and decided to begin working on a personal computer. Jobs sold his Volkswagen, Wozniak sold his HP scientific calculator, together raising $1,300 to fund their startup – the rest is history.

Halliday, David. 1983. “Steve Paul Jobs”. Current Biography 5 (February): 204-207.

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