San Bernardino Stories January 20

Police video shows Cellebrite device in action, says it ‘minimizes intrusion’

The police service in Scotland has posted a video showing a Cellebrite device in action, accessing text messages, photos, and calendar entries from a smartphone. The same device is used by many US law enforcement agencies

San Bernardino Stories January 8

We reported yesterday that there’s a new FBI iPhone case — the bureau again asking Apple to unlock two iPhones belonging to a suspected shooter.

There are obvious similarities between the San Bernardino and Pensacola cases. Not just that both relate to shootings and involve two iPhones, but also the fact that the FBI has decided to go public with its request for Apple to help…

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San Bernardino Stories October 24, 2019

Former FBI general counsel Jim Baker, who fought Apple on the San Bernardino iPhone case, says that he has now rethought some of his views on strong encryption.

Baker left the FBI last year to join a DC-based think tank, where his role is to write for the justice-focused blog, Lawfare

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San Bernardino Stories March 28, 2018

A Department of Justice investigation has concluded that the FBI inadvertently misled Congress when it said that it had exhausted all attempts to access the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino killers.

The FBI claimed in a court filing that it had no means to access data stored on the iPhone without Apple’s assistance, a claim later repeated to Congress. A report covering this statement concludes that while it was technically true, it gave a misleading impression …

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San Bernardino Stories May 8, 2017

After government refuses to declassify sum paid for FBI’s San Bernardino iPhone hack, senator inadvertently reveals it

The battle between the FBI and Apple over the San Bernardino iPhone may (for now) be long over, but one question remained: just how much did the FBI pay a third-party company to access the device?

San Bernardino Stories May 4, 2017

FBI director James Comey yesterday told a Senate oversight committee that the FBI has been unable to access almost half of the mobile devices it tried to examine in the first half of the fiscal year, reports TechCrunch.

Comey said the FBI had been unable to access the contents of more than 3,000 mobile devices in the first half of the fiscal year, using what he described as “appropriate and available technical tools, even though there was the legal authority to do so.” He said that represented “nearly half” of all the mobile devices it had attempted to access in that time frame.

Comey made the statement in apparent support of the latest attempt at forcing phone manufacturers to provide backdoor access to the authorities …

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