Nvidia Overview Updated May 11, 2017

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27 'Nvidia' stories

December 2010 - April 2017


Nvidia is best known as a designer of GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) for gaming and professional industries. Its well-regarded GeForce GTX line of gaming GPUs continue to set the benchmark for graphics performance on PCs.

Nvidia Stories April 11

AAPL: 141.63

-1.54

Nvidia has made good on its promise to release Pascal drivers for the Mac. This makes it possible to drive macOS with 10-series cards like the popular Geforce GTX 1080, or the newly released Titan Xp.

Up until now, users wishing to use modern Nvidia GPUs on a Mac were forced to use last-gen Maxwell-based hardware, such as the GTX 980 Ti and other 9-series cards. With the release of the Pascal drivers, more options have been opened up for eGPU users, legacy Mac Pro users, and Hackintosh users wishing to utilize the latest and greatest in GPU technology. expand full story

Nvidia Stories April 6

AAPL: 143.66

-0.36

I’m currently in the process of building a new Hackintosh rig for 2017, so imagine how surprised and happy I was to hear that Nvidia is working on beta drivers for its GPUs with the latest Pascal architecture. Up until today, I had just settled on being relegated to a Radeon RX 480, or a Maxwell-era Nvidia card.

Not having Pascal drivers for the Mac certainly didn’t diminish the Hackintosh community, but it was significantly limiting in both options and creativity.

With today’s announcement, the Hackintosh just got exponentially more appealing. Nvidia’s announcement is positive for a variety of reasons: there’s the prospect of using an eGPU setup with a MacBook Pro, along with future prospects of Nvidia cards powering future Mac Pro hardware.

But on the immediate horizon, the announcement is most promising for Hackintosh builders. With this in mind, I wanted to share the build that I’m currently working on in this first part of a multi part series. expand full story

Big news on the GPU front today for Mac users. Along with the announcement of its new ridiculously powerful Titan Xp GPU, Nvidia announced that new beta Pascal drivers are coming next week for the Mac.

This is great news for eGPU users and for those interested in building a Hackintosh. It also bodes well for the future of the upcoming modular Mac Pro. expand full story

Nvidia Stories January 9

AAPL: 118.99

1.08

Gaming on Macs has never been a primary use case, but for the few who do want to use their Macs for gaming — whether on the desktop or on a Macbook — there have never been great options. However, at CES 2017, NVIDIA has revealed that it’s game streaming service, GeForce Now, is headed to the platform.

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Nvidia Stories October 24, 2015

AAPL: 119.08

3.58

Following CEO Tim Cook saying that the car industry is ripe for a major disruption, Re/code reports that Apple has hired Jonathan Cohen, Nvidia’s director of deep learning. While many only associate Nvidia with phone and computer chips, the company has recently been entering the car market, specifically in the form of autonomous vehicles.

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Nvidia Stories May 12, 2015

Malware hidden in Nvidia GPUs can infect Macs too, say developers behind proof of concept

Anonymous developers who have successfully infected Nvidia GPU cards with malware on both Linux and Windows machines say that the same can be done on Macs, and that they will release the proof soon. The aim of the whitehat developers is to raise awareness of this new method of attack, reports IT World.

The team successfully created a piece of malware called WIN_JELLY which acts as a Remote Access Tool, enabling attackers to control a machine over the Internet. They now plan to release a version for OS X called MAC_JELLY, demonstrating that Macs too are vulnerable.

There are, they say, two core problems. First, the growing power of modern GPUs means that it is increasingly common for processing tasks to be passed to them, something that would look legitimate to the OS. Second, most security tools designed to detect malware don’t scan the RAM used by the GPU.

The developers hint that the Mac version of the exploit will use OpenCL, a framework for writing code that can run on multiple platforms – including GPUs – and which is installed as standard as part of OS X.

While Mac and iOS malware is rare, neither platform is immune from attack. Wirelurker was last year found to be capable of infecting non-jailbroken iOS devices when connected to Macs running compromised software, and Flashback infected hundreds of thousands of Macs back in 2012.

Apple recently pulled many antivirus apps from the iOS app store, though this may be because many of them performed no useful function.

Via Slashdot

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