Apps Stories May 12, 2015

think

FiftyThree’s drawing iPad app Paper has so far been pitched as a creative drawing tool, but the company now thinks it might have appeal for business presentations too. The latest version adds a Diagram tool that lets you create objects like shapes, arrows and lines, which the app keeps neat and tidy while retaining the hand-drawn look.

Think Kit is here! Now Paper gives you the power to create diagrams, charts, and wireframes at the speed of thought. Think Kit adds three new tools—Diagram, Cut, and Fill. Powered by the Intention Engine™, Think Kit helps you quickly create powerful, personable graphics to express any idea, and continue seamlessly into your favorite presentation app.

Your roughly-drawn shapes get turned into neat versions automatically when the Diagram tool is selected, and you can drag shapes to move or duplicate them. A Smart Fill function lets you add color, keeping it constrained to your shapes …  expand full story

Apple subsidiary FileMaker today introduced version 14, the first major update since 2013, of its popular iOS and Mac-based platform, which includes the FileMaker Pro, Go, and Server software suites. This new version focuses on separate enhancements for speed across the different software versions, with the Mac and Windows applications gaining improved features for productivity, and the iOS Go apps for iPad and iPhone receiving end-to-end redesigns for iOS 8. Below, we break down the most significant new features for the Pro, Go, and Server versions.

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Apps Stories May 11, 2015

9to5toys 

Apps Stories May 9, 2015

Until this year, Mac owners had three major options for organizing large digital photo collections: Apple’s mainstream iPhoto, Apple’s “pro” app Aperture, and Adobe’s similarly professional-grade Lightroom. When Apple discontinued iPhoto and Aperture in favor of an even more basic app called Photos, many people —amateur photographers and professionals alike — had to decide whether to downgrade to Photos or switch to Lightroom. Apple understood that it was ceding at least the professional market to Lightroom, and even helped Adobe to develop Aperture and iPhoto to Lightroom importers. With the writing on the wall, some people switched to Lightroom 5 well before Photos officially debuted last month.

I didn’t; since Lightroom 5 was almost three years old, I wanted to see what Adobe would deliver in its much-anticipated sequel. On April 21, Adobe released Lightroom 6 and Lightroom CC (2015) as standalone and cloud-linked versions of the same app. Both promise major speed improvements over Lightroom 5, new tools and brushes, a new facial recognition feature, automatic HDR and panoramic photo creation, and new slideshow options. As part of Adobe’s “Creative Cloud,” Lightroom CC comes bundled with Adobe’s latest version of Photoshop, plus cloud photo synchronization services, for $9.99 per month. Alternately, Lightroom 6 can be purchased by itself for $149 as a standalone download, minus Photoshop and cloud functionality.

Below, I’m going to focus on the key questions Aperture users have been asking: what it’s like to transition from Aperture to Lightroom — including new details added after initial publication of this article — plus which version of Lightroom to buy, and whether transitioning is a good (and safe) idea. The answers may surprise you…

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Apps Stories May 8, 2015

9to5google 

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