Apple and Amazon refuse to make full federal workforce diversity data public

From Apple's diversity microsite

From Apple’s diversity microsite

Although Apple published its own employee diversity report back in August, USA Today reports that the company has refused to make public the full data from its federal diversity filing. While companies are required to file this information annually in a form known as EEO-1, they are not legally obliged to make the data public.

Facebook, eBay, Google, Yahoo and LinkedIn are among the technology companies that have made public their EEO-1s […]

Chief among the companies that decided not to disclose their EEO-1s were Microsoft, Twitter, Apple and Amazon.

When USA Today pressed the matter, Twitter released its filing and Microsoft agreed to do so by the end of the month, but Apple and Amazon did not respond …  Read more

Apple’s satellite office trend continues with announcement of R&D facility in Japan

tokyo-007

Apple’s apparent trend of expanding its R&D efforts beyond Cupertino continues with the announcement of a “large research and development facility” in Japan.

While few details were given in local media reports (via Reuters), the source of the information appears rather reliable – a statement by Japanese Prime Minister Abe Shinzo …  Read more

Former Apple Global Supply Manager Paul Devine sentenced to a year in prison and $4.5M fine

Paul-shin-devine

A former Apple Global Supply Manager was sentenced in a San Jose federal court earlier this week nearly 3 years after being convicted of wire fraud, conspiracy and money laundering in relation to selling Apple iPhone and component secrets to Apple’s suppliers. AP notes that Paul Shin Devine was up to no good:

“The scheme funneled millions in kickbacks to Devine for passing along confidential information to Apple Inc. suppliers and manufacturers who used the secrets to negotiate more favorable deals.”

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iPod-related class action suit against Apple starts tomorrow, Steve Jobs emails & video key evidence

This case goes back a while ...

This case goes back a while …

Emails and a video deposition by Steve Jobs are likely to form key elements of the evidence in an iPod-related antitrust case against Apple which opens in California tomorrow, reports the NYT.

The case goes back more than a decade, to the time when iPods would play only music purchased from iTunes or ripped from CD, with consumers unable to play music bought from competing stores. The class action alleges that this amounted to anti-competitive behaviour, and that consumers were forced to pay higher prices as a result …  Read more

Apple looking to tap academic research expertise as it opens office in Cambridge, England

cambridge

Apple is opening its first office in Cambridge, England, close to the city’s world-famous university, according to a report in Business Weekly.

The Californian-based business is believed to have identified 90 Hills Road for its Cambridge city centre offices and R & D function. With Grade A office space at a premium in Cambridge, the US giant would probably start with around 20 staff but have capacity to gear up to as many as 40 in that space.

The offices overlook the Cambridge University botanical gardens …  Read more

Live blog: The latest news from Apple CEO Tim Cook’s WSJ interview

Mark Gurman | 20:56 More: 

Mark Gurman | 20:56 Tim Cook says he is meeting with Alibaba executives later this week about a potential tie-up for AliPay and Apple Pay. Biggest news of the night from a financial perspective. 

Mark Gurman | 20:53 More on Classic going away: it wasn’t worth updating it. 

Mark Gurman | 20:52 Cook on cheaper iPhones: 

Mark Gurman | 20:51 Tim Cook on why the iPod classic was discontinued: 

Mark Gurman | 20:50 On to questions!

Mark Gurman | 20:48

Mark Gurman | 20:47 Cook explaining iOS security: Apple unable to give up FaceTime and iMessage records. The usuals. 

Mark Gurman | 20:41 More at 11…. 

Mark Gurman | 20:41 On Buybacks:

Mark Gurman | 20:37

Mark Gurman | 20:37 Cook on Mac vs. Windows. OUCH! 

“Would you rather own the Macintosh business or any of the Windows OEMs?” — Tim Cook

Mark Gurman | 20:37 Cook on iOS vs. Android:

Mark Gurman | 20:34

Mark Gurman | 20:34 Cook repeating his comments from 2011, 2012, and 2013 about TV:

“What we’ll do I don’t want to be so clear on,” Cook says. “But it’s an area of a lot of interest. And I’m optimistic … that there can be something great done in the space.”

Mark Gurman | 20:31 Some more lack of clarity from Tim Cook on Apple Watch battery life 

Mark Gurman | 20:31

Mark Gurman | 20:30 Wow! 

Mark Gurman | 20:30 Cook on his own personal life:

Mark Gurman | 20:29 Huge activation numbers for Apple Pay:

Mark Gurman | 20:29 More on Apple Pay:

Mark Gurman | 20:28 Cook on Apple Pay situation:

Mark Gurman | 20:28 More on Apple Watch:

Mark Gurman | 20:27 Another photo:

Screenshot 2014-10-27 23.26.55

Mark Gurman | 20:26 Cook on the Watch:

Mark Gurman | 20:25 Cook says Apple’s services division makes Apple ~18 billion dollars per year. 

Mark Gurman | 20:25 And more on Macs:

Mark Gurman | 20:25 Cook on PCs:

Mark Gurman | 20:24 The Verge has a pic:

DSC01576-1

Mark Gurman | 20:23 Cook on iPhone: 

Mark Gurman | 20:11 Interesting: 

Mark Gurman | 19:25 ~ Half hour to go 

Seth Weintraub | 18:55 More Hugo+Tim

Seth Weintraub | 18:53

Tim Cook next to (TOUCHING!) Xiaomi’s Hugo Barra

Mark Gurman | 18:53 Is that an Android phone? 

tim-cook-the-d11-interview

Cook’s previous wide-ranging interview

Following the announcement of a record earnings results, the debut of a pair of new iPhones, the launch of Apple, the introduction of new iPads, and the unveiling of the upcoming Apple Watch, Apple CEO Tim Cook is taking the stage in California at the Wall Street Journal’s inaugural WSJ.D Live conference. Cook could drop some juicy details behind Apple’s latest products and about Apple’s future, and we’ll be using this live blog post to share the latest details from the interview. You can find all tonight’s action below and follow us for more updates on Twitter:

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California governor signs bill requiring all smartphones to have remote killswitches by July 2015

Activation-Lock-02

As we’ve previously covered, the state of California has been in the process of passing a bill that would require all smartphones sold within the state to come with a remote killswitch option to deter thieves. The bill was passed by the state legislature earlier this year, and today it was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown, as noted by CNET.

The law goes into effect in July 2015, and will require all smartphones sold within the state to include an option for remotely disabling a stolen device. Apple has already met the requirements of this law with its Activation Lock and Find My iPhone services, but now such features will be required by law on Android, Windows Phone, and other handsets.

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Apple formally acknowledges iMessage issue, says bug fix coming in a ‘future software update’

Messages

In a statement to Re/code, Apple has acknowledged the iMessage issue which affects customers who switch away from the iPhone, without disabling iMessage. This means that texts to these users are never delivered, as iPhone devices continue to use the iMessage protocol on the phone number that is no longer associated with an iPhone. Aside from a second-hand report by an AppleCare representative, this is Apple’s first official response to the recent criticism.

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Angela Ahrendts’ plan for the future of Apple Retail: China emphasis, mobile payments, revamped experience

Ahrendts succeeds Jobs, Johnson, and Browett (Graphic by Michael Steeber)

When Ron Johnson finalized his decision to move from leading Apple’s retail strategy to become the Chief Executive Officer of J.C. Penney, the executive jumped in his car to drive to Steve Jobs’ home and notify the Apple co-founder in his living room of the decision. During his short car ride to Jobs’ Palo Alto home in the summer of 2011, Johnson likely thought about how he would explain his choice. But what Johnson likely did not imagine is that it would take nearly three years for Apple to find a true new leader for the stores the duo created.

In one of current Apple CEO Tim Cook’s first major missteps, the long-time operations maestro hired John Browett, formerly of Dixons, to run retail. Browett’s hire was immediately met with skepticism from Apple customers and retail employees, but Cook defended the hire and called the British executive the “best [choice] by far” to run Apple’s retail division. In the six months that he ran retail, Browett cut back on employee hours, initiated layoffs, and fell out culturally with the rest of the Apple executive team.

John Browett visiting Apple Store

Alongside Scott Forstall, Browett was ejected from the Cupertino-based company, leaving Tim Cook and head-hunting firm Egon Zehnder, again, with the tall task of finding a suitable replacement for Ron Johnson. As the man who ran Dixons, the United Kingdom equivalent to Best Buy, Browett was in many ways built in the image of Johnson. Johnson ran Apple Retail for nearly a decade, and before that he was an executive at both Target and Mervyns. But unlike Browett, Johnson fit into Apple’s culture and was close with both Jobs and Cook throughout his tenure.

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Verdict: Apple awarded another $290 million from Samsung in retrial (Updated)

BZnq1C0CAAAGZT9.png-largeReports are coming in from several journalists attending the Apple vs. Samsung re-trial in California that a verdict has been reached. The verdict comes after a few days of the jury deliberating much of the same topic as discussed during the summer 2012 trial. According to a court document, the verdict will be read at approximate 12:15 Pacific time. We’ll have coverage when the verdict is announced.

Update: According to Bloombergthe jury has ordered that Samsung pay Apple $290 million in damages over the retrial. Including damages awarded Apple in the original trial, that brings Samsung’s total in damages owed to Apple to $890 million.

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