Instapaper Stories September 20

AAPL: 156.07

-2.66

Pinterest for iPad now lets you drag and drop from Safari to save pins on iOS 11 

iOS 11 brings desktop-class drag and drop support to the iPad, and Pinterest is using the new feature to make saving pins easier. The bookmarking app now lets you drag content from Safari directly into Pinterest to instantly create pins. You can use this new method in split view or with the new Dock on iOS 11.

Instapaper Stories August 23, 2016

AAPL: 108.85

0.34

Pinterest has purchased the popular read-it-later service Instapaper and plans to maintain the app and service for users. The purchase comes three years after Betaworks, the firm behind Digg, bought Instapaper from creator Marco Arment who currently developes the popular podcast player Overcast.

expand full story

Instapaper Stories July 30, 2015

AAPL: 122.37

-0.62

We know the developer behind the popular RSS client Reeder has been working on a version 3.0 update for OS X 10.10 Yosemite as we last saw a teaser in April. Today users get the first chance to try out the redesigned RSS service reader as the first public beta for Reeder 3 has gone live. The updated version sports a user interface designed for Yosemite and beyond, more themes for making reading comfortable, and even a few OS X El Capitan features. Reeder says the new version will be available as a free update to current Reeder 2 customers when it’s completed. expand full story

Instapaper Stories January 5, 2015

Apple’s marketing aims given priority over software quality, says Instapaper developer Marco Arment [Poll]

Apple is now so focused on marketing-driven goals that its software quality has “taken a nosedive” in the last few years, argues a blog post by Instapaper creator and former Tumblr lead developer Marco Arment.

[OS X is] riddled with embarrassing bugs and fundamental regressions [and] I fear that Apple’s leadership doesn’t realize quite how badly and deeply their software flaws have damaged their reputation

People are sticking with OS X not because they love it, he suggests, but because Windows is worse and desktop Linux is too much hassle.

The issue, believes Arment, is that Apple is so focused on releasing a major new version of OS X each year that it is making it impossible for engineering teams to maintain quality.

We don’t need major OS releases every year. We don’t need each OS release to have a huge list of new features. We need our computers, phones, and tablets to work well first so we can enjoy new features released at a healthy, gradual, sustainable pace.

Twitter commentators seem largely in agreement. What are your views? Would you like to see a slower pace of development in order to have greater reliability? Or do the new features make any glitches worthwhile? Take our poll, and let us know your views in the comments.

Instapaper Stories December 5, 2014

Popular Instapaper app for offline reading updated with support for Handoff & more

Instapaper, the handy app that lets you grab content from the web and other apps for offline reading later, has been updated with support for the Handoff feature introduced as part of iOS 8.

Device handoff support: Start reading on one device, and pick up exactly where you left off on another device!

Version 6.1 of the app also has an improved save function, allowing you to save content directly to a particular folder, and allows you to enable a counter which displays a badge with the number of saved articles when viewing the app’s icon on the homescreen.

Instapaper is a free app, but saving content from compatible third-party apps requires a premium subscription costing $29.99 a year or $2.99 a month.

If you haven’t yet gotten to grips with Handoff, our how-to guide tells you everything you need to know.

Instapaper Stories January 15, 2014

Review: Outread helps you get through your reading list even faster using a unique text highlighting system

Outread is a new speed reader app for the iPhone that helps you read faster by highlighting short sections of text. Focusing on the highlighted section helps you efficiently and quickly move through the text. This differs from most speed reader apps in that they use a technique called Rapid Serial Visual Presentation, which presents one word at a time.

Both of these speed reading techniques force the reader to stop reading out loud inside their head (subvocalization), which is what slows us down when we are reading. Generally a reader’s average reading speed is two hundred words per minute, but Outread supports reading speeds up to one thousand words per minute and a marker size of one hundred characters.

Under the app’s settings, you can adjust the Reading Speed (how many words go by per minute), Marker Size (how many characters are highlighted), and the size of the text. You can also enable a dark theme and see a preview of the different fonts that are available. The color of the highlighter is not customizable. Because of this, I found that it took me a while to find the highlighter when using the app’s dark theme.

Outread also has a feature that allows you to import text or URL’s from your clipboard. While it doesn’t automatically detect the clipboard’s contents when you launch the app, the function is only a tap away.

You are also able to install a “Read In Outread” bookmark which will save articles from Safari to the app’s reading list. When you save the articles to Outread, it downloads them for offline viewing so you can read them without an internet connection, which is perfect for use while traveling. If you use Pocket, Readability, or have an Instapaper subscription you are able to sign into these accounts in Outread and see your offline lists.

Outread does not support importing Microsoft Word documents, Pages files, or PDF files, which is inconvenient when it comes to reading papers and articles for school. Hopefully this functionality will be added in a future update. For now, copying the text from those documents and importing it via the clipboard is a helpful workaround.

I have been using Outread for reading the news and articles for school. Compared to other speed reader apps that use rapid serial visualization presentation, I find that it takes a bit of getting used to the animation when it scrolls down the page. If you want to try an app that can help you get through your reading list much faster, I recommend giving it a try. Outread is available in the App Store for $2.99.

Powered by WordPress.com VIP