Final Cut Pro X Overview Updated March 22, 2019

Final Cut Pro X

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66 'Final Cut Pro X' stories

January 2012 - March 2019


Final Cut Pro X is a non-linear trackless video editing application (NLE) created by Apple for the Mac. The original version of Final Cut Pro X was first released back in June 2011, and is available on the Mac App Store.

Final Cut Pro X is the successor to Final Cut Pro 7, a widely popular video editing application used by a wide variety of persons, including industry professionals and studios. Final Cut Pro X was very controversial when first released due to the fact that Apple essentially started with a clean slate, and rebuilt the app from the ground up for 64-bit machines. As such, many of the features deemed necessary by professionals were dropped for the initial releases.

Apple has since provided iterative updates to reinsert key features that were missing from the inaugural release. The current version of Final Cut Pro X is version 10.2.3.

Final Cut Pro X features a trackless magnetic timeline that allows clips to automatically slide into position. Users can thus edit footage in a storyline without knocking any other clips or audio out of place at other points on the timeline.

Final Cut Pro X supports Multicam footage, compound clips, and keyword management. All libraries, projects and events are organized in a logical structure that makes data management easy. Final Cut Pro X is well-known for its ability to scale between small underpowered machines as well as high-powered machines like the Mac Pro. Its implementation of proxy media and support for Intel’s Quick Sync Video, make it particularly attractive for MacBook users.

The great thing about Final Cut Pro X is that it’s a one-time purchase. Unlike competing apps like Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer, which both charge monthly or yearly subscription fees, Final Cut Pro X can be purchased for a one-time fee of $299. While the upfront cost may seem substantial, it will save most users a significant amount of money over the long term, as every update since its initial release over five years ago has been free.

Apple also offers a free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X on its website.

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 22

Apple has released the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, version 10.4.6. The update is dominated by stability improvements and bug fixes, but it also contains one major new feature pertaining to future versions of macOS. Watch as we explain what that means for current Final Cut Pro X users. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 21

Apple releases Final Cut Pro 10.4.6 with stability and bug fixes

Apple has issued a stability and bug fix update for Final Cut Pro X. Version 10.4.6, now available via the Mac App Store, focuses primarily on boosting the reliability of Apple’s flagship NLE.

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 15

Whenever I post a video on YouTube, I strive to post accompanying teaser footage on 9to5mac’s official Instagram account. Because Instagram Stories are traditionally viewed in portrait mode, you’ll need to configure your project and corresponding video export with vertical orientation in mind. Watch this week’s episode of Final Cut Friday as I briefly step through my Instagram Stories workflow.

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Final Cut Pro X Stories March 1

Last week we discussed how to create one-off title cards for FCP X on a per-project basis. This week, we’ll show you how to create title cards that can be reused and customized — handy if you often use title cards in your projects.

By enlisting Motion 5, Apple’s $50 motion graphics application, you can shave off precious time from your editing sessions. Watch our brief hands-on video for more details. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories February 22

In some of my videos I like to use title cards to separate subjects being discussed. I find that title cards are especially useful when creating videos that are based around a topical list of features. One such example being a recent video where I discussed some of the top iPhone tips that everyone should know.

Although it’s possible to quickly create these title cards in a third-party app like Affinity Designer, making them directly within Final Cut Pro X presents several key benefits. Watch this week’s Final Cut Friday video tutorial for the details.  expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories February 15

Transitions are key building blocks for putting together cohesive videos in your NLE of choice. In Final Cut Pro X, there are many shortcuts, tips, and tricks that can be used while inserting or editing transitions. In this week’s episode of Final Cut Friday, I share 10 transition tips to help you master this vital part of the editing process. expand full story

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