Final Cut Pro X Overview Updated June 23, 2017

Final Cut Pro X

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34 Final Cut Pro X stories

January 2012 - June 2017


Final Cut Pro X is a non-linear trackless video editing application (NLE) created by Apple for the Mac. The original version of Final Cut Pro X was first released back in June 2011, and is available on the Mac App Store.

Final Cut Pro X is the successor to Final Cut Pro 7, a widely popular video editing application used by a wide variety of persons, including industry professionals and studios. Final Cut Pro X was very controversial when first released due to the fact that Apple essentially started with a clean slate, and rebuilt the app from the ground up for 64-bit machines. As such, many of the features deemed necessary by professionals were dropped for the initial releases.

Apple has since provided iterative updates to reinsert key features that were missing from the inaugural release. The current version of Final Cut Pro X is version 10.2.3.

Final Cut Pro X features a trackless magnetic timeline that allows clips to automatically slide into position. Users can thus edit footage in a storyline without knocking any other clips or audio out of place at other points on the timeline.

Final Cut Pro X supports Multicam footage, compound clips, and keyword management. All libraries, projects and events are organized in a logical structure that makes data management easy. Final Cut Pro X is well-known for its ability to scale between small underpowered machines as well as high-powered machines like the Mac Pro. Its implementation of proxy media and support for Intel’s Quick Sync Video, make it particularly attractive for MacBook users.

The great thing about Final Cut Pro X is that it’s a one-time purchase. Unlike competing apps like Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer, which both charge monthly or yearly subscription fees, Final Cut Pro X can be purchased for a one-time fee of $299. While the upfront cost may seem substantial, it will save most users a significant amount of money over the long term, as every update since its initial release over five years ago has been free.

Apple also offers a free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X on its website.

Final Cut Pro X Stories June 23

AAPL: 146.28

0.65

Final Cut Pro X has been used for everything from ads to Hollywood movies, but the software didn’t get the easiest of rides from the industry when Apple first launched the radically-different version of the app.

Now a film editor who has used FCP X for six independent feature films has decided it’s time that the software itself took centre stage, with a documentary about its controversial introduction and journey to two million users …

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Final Cut Pro X Stories May 11

AAPL: 153.95

1.32

If you find yourself hanging out for a while at a scenic spot, creating a timelapse video can be a great way to share the experience with friends.

The iPhone, of course, has a built-in timelapse feature – and a very clever one it is too. So if you want to use your iPhone or iPad to shoot, you’re good to go. But if you want to use another camera, Final Cut Pro X makes it a really simple process to create a timelapse video, regardless of whether you’re working from video footage or still photos.

I had been holding out on this one hoping for better weather for the demo video, but as the weather gods aren’t cooperating, we’ll go with what I’ve got …

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The best 4K & 5K displays for Mac

Final Cut Pro X Stories May 10

AAPL: 153.26

-0.73

If you’re looking to build a Hackintosh that can serve as a competent Windows gaming rig on the side, then a build powered by an Nvidia GPU is a good choice. In our most recent Hackintosh build, we paired an Intel i7 6700k with Nvidia’s fastest gaming GPU, the 1080 Ti.

The results weren’t all that surprising. Performance was good in a macOS environment even when using Nvidia’s beta web drivers. Performance was a lot better, though, in a Windows environment, where Pascal GPUs can really thrive.

If you’re interested in building a Hackintosh solely for video editing, however, then an Nvidia-powered GPU option might not be the best choice. Sure, Nvidia GPUs with their CUDA cores are generally superior for editing in an Adobe workflow, but if you’re building a Hackintosh machine solely for video editing, chances are you’re interested in running Final Cut Pro X.

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Final Cut Pro X Stories May 3

AAPL: 147.06

-0.45

If you’d like to add tracked text to Final Cut Pro X, there are many ways to go about doing so. For instance, I used to faux-track objects manually by using keyframes. Needless to say that was quite the tedious endeavor.

Tracking text is easier and much more accurate when using a plugin like MotionVFX’s mCallouts, which is powered by the excellent Mocha Tracking Technology from Imagineer Systems.

There are several packages in the mCallouts series, but each of them contain a heaping helping of callout styles that you can use to add tracked text to the objects in your Final Cut Pro X projects. In this brief hands-on video walkthrough, I’ll show you just how easy it is. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories April 26

AAPL: 143.68

-0.85

Apple has announced that it now has two million Final Cut Pro X users – or ‘seats,’ in the terminology used when speaking to an audience at the National Association of Broadcasters’ annual conference.

Apple said that it hit the milestone some five and a half years after launching version 10 of the professional video editing app. Notably, it said that the pace of adoption was increasing. While the company didn’t provide specific dates, it said that it had taken much less time to grow from 1M to 2M users than it had taken to hit that first million.

The milestone is significant given initial reactions to the app …

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Final Cut Pro X Stories February 27

AAPL: 136.93

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I mentioned in my previous Final Cut Pro Diary piece that I attended one of Apple’s free workshops, Final Cut Pro for Storytellers. There was a lot to take in, and as a complete beginner at the time, I knew I’d only really remember some percentage of it.

As the tutor had been really helpful in answering individual questions as well as covering the syllabus of the course, and I was keen to understand how to adjust exposure and boost saturation, I figured that repeating the workshop would be a good plan. This would allow me to get some one-to-one help with my specific questions, while also getting to grips with more of the core material.

As it turned out, that plan worked really well, and is one I’d recommend to any Final Cut Pro novice …

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