Final Cut Pro X Overview Updated October 19, 2016

Final Cut Pro X

Final Cut Pro X is a non-linear trackless video editing application (NLE) created by Apple for the Mac. The original version of Final Cut Pro X was first released back in June 2011, and is available on the Mac App Store.

Final Cut Pro X is the successor to Final Cut Pro 7, a widely popular video editing application used by a wide variety of persons, including industry professionals and studios. Final Cut Pro X was very controversial when first released due to the fact that Apple essentially started with a clean slate, and rebuilt the app from the ground up for 64-bit machines. As such, many of the features deemed necessary by professionals were dropped for the initial releases.

Apple has since provided iterative updates to reinsert key features that were missing from the inaugural release. The current version of Final Cut Pro X is version 10.2.3.

Final Cut Pro X features a trackless magnetic timeline that allows clips to automatically slide into position. Users can thus edit footage in a storyline without knocking any other clips or audio out of place at other points on the timeline.

Final Cut Pro X supports Multicam footage, compound clips, and keyword management. All libraries, projects and events are organized in a logical structure that makes data management easy. Final Cut Pro X is well-known for its ability to scale between small underpowered machines as well as high-powered machines like the Mac Pro. Its implementation of proxy media and support for Intel’s Quick Sync Video, make it particularly attractive for MacBook users.

The great thing about Final Cut Pro X is that it’s a one-time purchase. Unlike competing apps like Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer, which both charge monthly or yearly subscription fees, Final Cut Pro X can be purchased for a one-time fee of $299. While the upfront cost may seem substantial, it will save most users a significant amount of money over the long term, as every update since its initial release over five years ago has been free.

Apple also offers a free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X on its website.

21 Final Cut Pro X stories

January 2012 - October 2016

Final Cut Pro X Stories October 19

AAPL: 117.12

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It’s been months since Apple’s pro video app Final Cut Pro X received an update, but if the trial version is anything to go by, then an update may be right around the corner. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories September 9

AAPL: 103.13

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Final Cut Pro X Stories July 29

AAPL: 104.21

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Final Cut Pro X Stories July 22

AAPL: 98.66

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Since the 12″ MacBook is significantly limited when it comes to attaching external peripherals, I generally do all of my editing work in Final Cut Pro X with events stored directly on device. Being that I shoot 99% of our videos in 4K, you can probably imagine how quickly my MacBook’s storage is exhausted.

Needless to say, I’ve become accustomed to archiving events on a bi-weekly basis to save on space. In this hands-on tutorial, I’ll share my easy-to-use workflow for archiving Final Cut Pro X events and media to an external drive. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories July 11

AAPL: 96.98

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I’ve been using Final Cut Pro X on a regular basis since it debuted back in June of 2011. With five years under my belt, I feel pretty comfortable navigating around the interface, utilizing custom keyboard shortcuts, and all of the other benefits that come with being intimately familiar with a piece of software.

If you’ve read any of my previous posts about Final Cut Pro X, you’ve probably concluded that I have a strong affinity for the app, despite some of the hate that it receives.

I’m also someone who likes to recommend Final Cut Pro X to new editors. I think that it’s easier to grasp and much more friendlier to work with on a Mac than competing apps like Adobe Premiere Pro.

So when EditorsKeys, a company that produces a keyboard specifically designed for Final Cut Pro X, asked me to do a review, I was intrigued. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories July 8

AAPL: 96.68

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I love my 2016 MacBook for a variety of reasons, but there are still some areas where its Core M processor struggles to keep up. When it comes to exporting 4K video, the MacBook shines due to Intel Quick Sync Video hardware encoding. Editing 4K video, however, is much more taxing on the MacBook, especially when employing various effects and color correction.

Thankfully, Final Cut Pro X has built-in features that allow users to edit 4K video on even the most anemic of systems. In this post, we’ll show you how to leverage proxy media in order to successfully edit video on an underpowered Mac. expand full story


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