Final Cut Pro X Overview Updated August 17, 2019

Final Cut Pro X

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69 'Final Cut Pro X' stories

January 2012 - August 2019


Final Cut Pro X is a non-linear trackless video editing application (NLE) created by Apple for the Mac. The original version of Final Cut Pro X was first released back in June 2011, and is available on the Mac App Store.

Final Cut Pro X is the successor to Final Cut Pro 7, a widely popular video editing application used by a wide variety of persons, including industry professionals and studios. Final Cut Pro X was very controversial when first released due to the fact that Apple essentially started with a clean slate, and rebuilt the app from the ground up for 64-bit machines. As such, many of the features deemed necessary by professionals were dropped for the initial releases.

Apple has since provided iterative updates to reinsert key features that were missing from the inaugural release. The current version of Final Cut Pro X is version 10.2.3.

Final Cut Pro X features a trackless magnetic timeline that allows clips to automatically slide into position. Users can thus edit footage in a storyline without knocking any other clips or audio out of place at other points on the timeline.

Final Cut Pro X supports Multicam footage, compound clips, and keyword management. All libraries, projects and events are organized in a logical structure that makes data management easy. Final Cut Pro X is well-known for its ability to scale between small underpowered machines as well as high-powered machines like the Mac Pro. Its implementation of proxy media and support for Intel’s Quick Sync Video, make it particularly attractive for MacBook users.

The great thing about Final Cut Pro X is that it’s a one-time purchase. Unlike competing apps like Adobe Premiere and Avid Media Composer, which both charge monthly or yearly subscription fees, Final Cut Pro X can be purchased for a one-time fee of $299. While the upfront cost may seem substantial, it will save most users a significant amount of money over the long term, as every update since its initial release over five years ago has been free.

Apple also offers a free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X on its website.

Final Cut Pro X Stories Yesterday

Final Cut Pro X features a decent built-in stabilization system that can easily be enabled with just a click in the Inspector. However, if you’re looking for a much more robust and customizable stabilization system, look no further than Pixel Film Studios’ FCPX Stabilizer 2.0. For a limited time, you can get 30% off by using code 9to5pixel.

In this hands-on video, we showcase how this plugin can not only perform simple stabilizations, but is capable of breathing new life into otherwise mundane footage. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories May 10

Final Cut Friday: How to store FCP X libraries on a Synology NAS [Video]

In this walkthrough, we show you how to easily store Final Cut Pro X libraries on a Synology NAS with just a few configuration steps. We’ve posted a prior solution before that utilized the NFS protocol, but this solution uses SMB. Watch our hands-on video tutorial for the details.

Final Cut Pro X Stories May 3

In this week’s edition of Final Cut Friday, I explain why it’s advantageous to switch to the Checkerboard Player Background from the standard black background when editing video. Watch our brief hands-on video explainer for the details. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 22

Apple has released the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, version 10.4.6. The update is dominated by stability improvements and bug fixes, but it also contains one major new feature pertaining to future versions of macOS. Watch as we explain what that means for current Final Cut Pro X users. expand full story

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 21

Apple releases Final Cut Pro 10.4.6 with stability and bug fixes

Apple has issued a stability and bug fix update for Final Cut Pro X. Version 10.4.6, now available via the Mac App Store, focuses primarily on boosting the reliability of Apple’s flagship NLE.

Final Cut Pro X Stories March 15

Whenever I post a video on YouTube, I strive to post accompanying teaser footage on 9to5mac’s official Instagram account. Because Instagram Stories are traditionally viewed in portrait mode, you’ll need to configure your project and corresponding video export with vertical orientation in mind. Watch this week’s episode of Final Cut Friday as I briefly step through my Instagram Stories workflow.

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