AAPL stock Stories August 6, 2015

AAPL: 115.13

0.25

Morgan Stanley maintains AAPL as a buy, giving four reasons for expecting stock to climb

Following Bank of America Merrill Lynch yesterday giving six reasons for downgrading AAPL stock, Morgan Stanley has responded today with four reasons it continues to rate the stock a Buy, reports Business Insider.

In a note to clients on Thursday, Morgan Stanley’s Katy Huberty maintained an “Overweight” rating and $155 price target on the stock, arguing that the company will not see a similar stock meltdown to what was experienced after a huge run-up in 2012. 

While acknowledging that supply may be catching up with demand, leading to supply chain reports of seemingly weaker sales, Huberty says there are four reasons the stock is likely to climb.

  1. Gross margins are improving, not deteriorating, as the company heads into the next iPhone cycle.
  2. There’s low institutional ownership of the stock. 
  3. Apple has a more competitive product line-up and a “stickier” ecosystem against Android.
  4. There’s a more robust product and services roadmap.

Addressing concerns about the impact the weak Chinese economy may have on Apple, Huberty says that smartphones costing more than $300 each have been increasing their market share, meaning that Apple is well placed to continue to grow its business in the country.

AAPL stock Stories August 5, 2015

AAPL: 114.64

-3.80

The stock market can often seem an irrational place, and never more so than where AAPL is concerned. The company keeps reporting record sales, has typically out-performed analyst expectations, takes home almost the entire smartphone industry’s profits and has so much cash it scarcely knows what to do with it – yet its share price is falling.

AAPL stock has fallen more than 14% since April, wiping $113B from the company’s market valuation. It dropped 7% in the past month alone. That’s the equivalent of McDonalds vanishing into thin air. What gives?  expand full story

AAPL stock Stories December 10, 2014

AAPL spending almost all its US cash reserves on dividends and stock buybacks

Analysis by Above Avalon‘s Neil Cybart suggests that Apple is unlikely to accelerate the pace of its stock buyback program as it is already spending almost all of its available US cash stockpile on share dividends and buybacks.

Out of $155B of cash, only $18B is available in the U.S., with the rest sitting in international subsidiaries unable to be sent back unless repatriation tax is paid […] Apple is essentially taking most, if not all, of its free cash flow from U.S. operations and piling it into share buyback.

Cybart does some number-crunching to suggest that Apple is likely to buy back around $30B worth of stock next year, though acknowledges that new product lines like the Apple Watch make it difficult to forecast future profits with any certainty.

Apple has come under consistent pressure from billionaire shareholder Carl Icahn to increase the pace of its stock buyback program, recently suggesting that an accelerated buyback could see the company achieve a trillion dollar valuation. It was recently estimated that Apple’s cash reserves would have reached $210B without the dividend and stock buyback program started two years ago.

AAPL stock Stories September 1, 2014

PSA: Don’t be surprised (or worried) if AAPL stock dips after iPhone 6 launch …

If there’s one thing as certain as the hype when Apple launches a new iPhone, it’s the “Apple is doomed” messages when the new model(s) fail to meet every single analyst prediction, no matter how crazy. Apple could add a matter transporter function to the iPhone 6 and some analyst would be complaining that it only operates on WiFi when they were expecting it to use LTE.

Business Insider pointed to a set of CNN charts which show that, typically, the AAPL stock price is down a month after a new iPhone launch. But any similar dip we might see after the launch of the iPhone 6 is no cause for concern: with the exception of 2013, Apple stock has been climbing since the first iPhone was launched in 2007.

As ever, make your own investment decisions with the aid of professional advice, but there certainly doesn’t appear to be any reason to be spooked if the launch of the new iPhone leads to some investors selling their shares. “Buy on the rumor, sell on the news” is a very common approach.

AAPL stock Stories June 6, 2014

Apple’s retail head Angela Ahrendts has stock withheld for tax purposes (Updated)

SEC filings show that Angela Ahrendts had half of her first allocation of AAPL stock withheld on 1st June – the day it vested, and just one month after joining the company – reports ComputerWorld.

According to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Ahrendts received 16,264 shares in Apple stock when it vested June 1 […]

Ahrendts sold 8,331 shares that same day for a pre-tax total of $5,273,523.

The full value of her stock, which is likely to vest (become eligible for sale) over several years, will add up to $78.5M at the current share price. Her total compensation in her final year as CEO of Burberry was $4.4M – though she did also get a clothing allowance of $42,000 and a car allowance of $30,000 (only at a fashion company could you get more to spend on clothes than a car …).

Selling half your stock at the very first opportunity doesn’t seem to send the best of signals a month into the role, but I guess she needs to buy a house out in the Valley and those aren’t exactly cheap right now.

The withholding of the shares came just over a week before a 7-to-1 stock split, on Monday. The stock split should make AAPL shares more attractive to smaller investors, a shift that could make the share price more volatile.

Via Fortune

Update: These shares were withheld for tax purposes by Apple not sold on the open market

AAPL stock Stories April 29, 2014

four-stocks1

Investors seem to have taken heed of analyst ratings in response to the higher-than-predicted earnings Apple reported last week, the share price climbing from $524.75 before the company released its financials to approaching $600 at the time of writing.

Fortune suggests Apple’s results isn’t the only factor at play, with investors perhaps also following Greenlight Capital’s lead in moving out of other tech stock with particularly high price to earnings ratios – the measure of how a share price relates to its earnings. The higher the P/E ratio, the more over-valued it looks according to traditional measures …  expand full story

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